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I have tried countless recommendations in this site for the awk syntax but somehow i cannot get my head around awk..

I am trying to combine two lines ( the current one and the next one ) only when my expr exists in the next line.

For example I have a text file which contains the following:

<option value="1" selected> channel 1 
<div id="program_13" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="13">&nbsp; &nbsp;Somename1</div>
<option value="2" selected> channel 2 
<div id="program_21" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="21">&nbsp; &nbsp;Someothername</div>
<option value="3" selected> channel 3 
<option value="4" selected> channel 4 
<option value="5" selected> channel 5

I want to join the current line with the next one only when the "output_checkbox" expression exists within the next line. This may be truth for all OR any of the 5 main lines.

On the example above, my desired result would be :

<option value="1" selected> channel 1 <div id="program_13" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="13">&nbsp; &nbsp;Somename1</div>
<option value="2" selected> channel 2 <div id="program_21" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="21">&nbsp; &nbsp;Someothername</div>
<option value="3" selected> channel 3 
<option value="4" selected> channel 4 
<option value="5" selected> channel 5

I am hoping to get the following at the end by using sed (which i think i can handle):

channel 1: Somename1
channel 2: Someothername
channel 3: 
channel 4: 
channel 5:

I am looking forward to your suggestions

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

try this line:

awk '/output_checkbox/{printf "%s",$0;next}{printf (NR>1?"\n%s":"%s"), $0}END{print ""}' file

little test:

kent$  cat f
<option value="1" selected> channel 1 
<div id="program_13" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="13">&nbsp; &nbsp;Somename1</div>
<option value="2" selected> channel 2 
<div id="program_21" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="21">&nbsp; &nbsp;Someothername</div>
<option value="3" selected> channel 3 
<option value="4" selected> channel 4 
<option value="5" selected> channel 5

kent$  awk '/output_checkbox/{printf "%s",$0;next}{printf (NR>1?"\n%s":"%s"), $0}END{print ""}' f 
<option value="1" selected> channel 1 <div id="program_13" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="13">&nbsp; &nbsp;Somename1</div>
<option value="2" selected> channel 2 <div id="program_21" class="tree_3"><input type="checkbox" name="output_checkbox" value="21">&nbsp; &nbsp;Someothername</div>
<option value="3" selected> channel 3 
<option value="4" selected> channel 4 
<option value="5" selected> channel 5
share|improve this answer

I came up with the following:

/output_checkbox/ { sub(/\n/, "", last); printf "%s" last; print; last = "" }

!/output_checkbox/ { printf "%s" last; last = ($0  "\n"); } 

END { printf "%s" last }
share|improve this answer
1  
never use printf with input data as the format argument or you'll get nasty surprises when your input contains formatting characters (e.g. %s). Use printf "%s" last, not printf last. – Ed Morton Sep 27 '13 at 20:14
    
Good point, I will update my answer. – Gavin Smith Sep 27 '13 at 20:16

The easiest way is to just keep the previous line in a variable:

awk '/pattern/{print prev $0;prev="";next} prev{print prev} {prev=$0} END{print prev}'

As @Kent points out, there is an ambiguity in the problem specification: What is desired if two consecutive lines match /pattern/ (I gather this is not an issue in the actual problem presented in the OP.)

My little program assumes that the intent is that /pattern/ be appended to the previous line only if the previous line did not itself match /pattern/. So it will turn:

<line>1
<pattern>2
<pattern>3

into

<line>1<pattern>2
<pattern>3

But there is another interpretation, where all /pattern/ lines are appended, producing:

<line>1<pattern>2<pattern>3

To get that result, a simple modification:

awk '/pattern/{prev = prev $0; next} prev{print prev} {prev=$0} END{print prev}'

NOTE: Both of those programs delete blank lines.

share|improve this answer
    
could have problem if there are continuous /patter/ lines – Kent Sep 27 '13 at 16:07
    
@Kent: I guess that depends on what is desired in that case. In the above, I explicitly reset prev to avoid repetition, but the alternative would be to replace the first execution block with {prev=prev $0; next} – rici Sep 27 '13 at 16:10
    
the command in your UPDATE won't give that result. it overwritten the prev in {prev=$0}. you need to find the right point to output. anyway, your first one-liner may already solve OP's problem.... – Kent Sep 27 '13 at 16:16
    
@kent: oops. Let me fix that. Thanks. – rici Sep 27 '13 at 16:27

I have no clue about Awk but if you would like to have a normal pattern, this one would work:

.+?(channel .+?)(?:(?:\s|\z)+?.+? &nbsp;(.+?)</div>)?

the result would be that:

channel 1 Somename1
channel 2 Someothername
channel 3   
channel 4   
channel 5   

If you want to use awk, this could help you: http://www.unixcl.com/search/label/Awk

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't check for the condition if "output_checkbox" expression exists – jkshah Sep 27 '13 at 17:33
    
There is no need for this. Look at his post what he wants as the end result. Its Exept from the : exactly the same! – Teifun2 Sep 27 '13 at 17:38

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