Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, when we create constructor function for creating new object the new keyword does 3 things I'am going to explain it but please correct me if I'am wrong i want to be sure I'am correct

first i will create a constructor function

function ObjectCreate(){
    this.a = "a";
    this.b = "b";

    ObjectCreate.prototype.show = function(){
        alert(this.a+" "+this.b);
    }
}

obj1 = new ObjectCreate();

now the first thing new keyword does is create new object and set its secret link to its constructor's prototype and pass it to the constructor function where now the this can refer to it and please note this does not refer to obj1 at this point because once constructor finished creating object only then it returns the newly created object to obj1 variable. i ask this question because some people say that this refer to the obj1 object in this case. so am i right here.

share|improve this question
    
Is there some reason why you can't just try it yourself? –  Juhana Sep 27 '13 at 16:46
    
did you understand my question ? –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:48
    
its not about trying the code i am just asking something –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:49
3  
but trying the code could probably answer your question, right? –  KenB Sep 27 '13 at 16:49
    
its not about code correcting issue i am correcting my concept –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In this example, during constructor invocation, obj1 is undefined. Value is assigned to obj1 variable after ObjectCreate function returns.

You can check yourself:

function ObjectCreate(){
    this.a = "a";
    this.b = "b";

    alert(obj1); // yields "undefined"
    ObjectCreate.prototype.show = function(){
        alert(this.a+" "+this.b);
    }
}

var obj1 = new ObjectCreate(); // note "var"
share|improve this answer
    
yeah that means i am right –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:57
    
what do u say about above answer someone posted is it write because it says that objectCreate cant contain objectCreate.prototype ? is right thing –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 17:04
    
You can assign functions to object prototype in constructor, but it will be executed every time constructor is run. So, it's better to assign method functions to object's prototype once, outside constructor function. –  el.pescado Sep 27 '13 at 17:17

Your phrasing is a bit confusing, but I'll do my best. First, you should note that your curly braces are a bit off. Your code should look like this:

function ObjectCreate(){
   this.a = "a";
   this.b = "b";
}

ObjectCreate.prototype.show = function(){
     alert(this.a+" "+this.b);
}

obj1 = new ObjectCreate();

You need to define your constructor, then attach things to its prototype.

When you call the constructor, the this keyword does basically refer to the new object being created. This is important because, for example, you could write a constructor like:

function ObjectCreate(x,y){
   this.a = x*x;
   this.b = y*x+4;
}
obj1 = new ObjectCreate(10,20);

Here, as in all constructors, this refers to the instance being created (obj1, in this case).

I think you suggested that this refers to the object's prototype, but that would make this.a and this.b static variables, which would be useless in a constructor like the one here, since every time you initialized a new object you would change the vale of this.a and this.b for all previously existing objects, and that just isn't useful.

I hope that answered your question. If not, please go ahead and leave comments for further clarification.

share|improve this answer
    
i said that this refers to newly created object not to obj1 at the time of creation once the constructor finished executing only then the object is returned to obj1. am i right here –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:53
    
obj1 is the newly created object. What's the difference? –  KenB Sep 27 '13 at 16:55
    
not realy obj1 is undefined at this point isn't it? –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 16:57
    
You are in the process of defining it. Are you asking whether or not the object is called obj1 during the creation process? That seems like a question of pure semantics. –  KenB Sep 27 '13 at 16:59
    
yes exactly what do you say about that ? –  abdul raziq Sep 27 '13 at 17:01

It seems nobody mentioned that this refers to the invoking object.

window.sayHi=function(){
  console.log(this.name);
}
window.name="Window"
window.sayHi();//=Window

var obj={
  name:"obj"
}
obj.fn=window.sayHi;

obj.fn();//=obj

The code above shows that when passing functions around the this context will change. If you don't want that then you can pass a closure instead of the function or use call, apply or bind:

//closure example
obj.fn=(function(w){//w is available because the returned function is a closure
  return function(){
    w.sayHi();
  }
}(window));

obj.fn();//=Window
//using call
obj.fn.call(window);//=Window
//using apply
obj.fn.apply(window);//=Window
//using bind
var boundFn=obj.fn.bind(window);
boundFn();//=Window

That was when you pass a function as a parameter on another object. When you use constructor functions then this within the function body will refer to the object to be created.

But when you pass around it's functions it may not be:

var obj={
  name:"obj"
}
var Test=function(){
  this.name="Test";
}
Test.prototype.sayHi=function(){
  console.log(this.name);
};

var t=new Test();
obj.fn=t.sayHi
t.sayHi();//=Test
obj.fn();//=obj

This is a pitfall most people fall in when passing object instance functions to setTimeout or event handlers:

someButton.onclick=t.sayHi;//when button is clicked this will be the button clicked
setTimeout(t.sayHi,100);//when sayHi is executed 'this' will be window

To answer your question about obj1 existing within the constructor function's body; I'd say no (not in Firefox at least). I don't have a link to the specs but obj1 would be set to this when the constructor function returns:

//clean up window.t
delete window.t;
var Test=function(){
  this.name="Test";
  console.log("and window.t is:",window.t);//undefined
}
Test.prototype.sayHi=function(){
  console.log(this.name);
};

window.t=new Test();

More on constructor functions, prototype, inheritance, overriding and calling super here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.