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This program is supposed to call the first function, read-series and then pass the input of every iteration of the while loop to the even-odds function which would tell if the number was even or odd and make VARSUMODDS=the value of VARSUMODDS+input if it was odd or make VARPRODUCTEVENS=the value of VARSUMEVENS*input. Then it would print them out. I'm sure there are a thousand syntax errors here, so please, be brutal. Keep in mind that I just started learning this language and I just came to it knowing only C++ and Java a few days ago, so don't expect me to understand complex answers. Thanks!

#! /bin/bash
TMPDIR=${HOME}/tmpdir
echo "Enter an integer: "
VARSUMODDS=0
VARPRODUCTEVENS=0
function read-series() {
    while read numbers ; do
        echo "Enter an integer: "
        even-odds $numbers
    done
    echo numbers > $TMPDIR/$$.temp
    return 0;
}

function even-odds() {

    evenp=$(( $1 % 2 ))
    if [ $evenp -eq 0 ] ; then
        $VARPRODUCTEVENS=$(($VARPRODUCTEVENS * $1))
        return 0;
    else
        $VARSUMODDS=$(($VARSUMODDS + $1))
        return 1;
    fi
}
function reduce () {
    echo -n "Sum of odds: "
    echo VARSUMODDS
    echo -n "Product of evens: "
    echo VARPRODUCTEVENS
    return 0;
}

read-series
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. You should initialize VARPRODUCTEVENS to 1, because multiplying anything by 0 produces 0.
  2. $ should not be put before the variable being assigned in an assignment statement.
  3. You can use the -p option to read to specify a prompt
  4. You're writing to $$.temp after the loop is done. numbers will be empty then, so you're not writing anything to the file. If you want to record all the numbers that were entered, you must do that inside the loop, and use >> to append to the file instead of overwriting it.
  5. There's no reason to use return in your functions -- nothing tests the exit status. And non-zero is usually used to mean there was an error.
  6. You defined a function reduce to print the results, but never called it
  7. You need to put $ before the variable names on all your echo lines.
  8. Don't put function before function definitions; it's allowed, but not required, and not portable (it's a bash extension).
#! /bin/bash
TMPDIR=${HOME}/tmpdir
VARSUMODDS=0
VARPRODUCTEVENS=1
read-series() {
    while read -p "Enter an integer: " numbers ; do
        even-odds $numbers
        echo $numbers >> $TMPDIR/$$.temp
    done
}

even-odds() {

    evenp=$(( $1 % 2 ))
    if [ $evenp -eq 0 ] ; then
        VARPRODUCTEVENS=$(($VARPRODUCTEVENS * $1))
    else
        VARSUMODDS=$(($VARSUMODDS + $1))
    fi
}
reduce () {
    echo ''
    echo -n "Sum of odds: "
    echo $VARSUMODDS
    echo -n "Product of evens: "
    echo $VARPRODUCTEVENS
}

read-series
reduce
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#! /bin/bash

tmpdir=${HOME}/tmpdir
mkdir -p $tmpdir

odd_sum=0
even_product=1
numbers=()

read-series() {
    while read -p "Enter an integer (q to quit): " number ; do
        [[ $number == [Qq]* ]] && break
        even-odds $number
        numbers+=($number)
    done
    printf "%d\n" "${numbers[@]}" > $tmpdir/$$.temp
}

even-odds() {
    if (( $1 % 2 == 0 )) ; then
        (( even_product *= $1 ))
    else
        (( odd_sum += $1 ))
    fi
}

reduce () {
    echo "Sum of odds: $odd_sum"
    echo "Product of evens: $even_product"
}

read-series
reduce

Notes:

  • make sure your tmpdir exists
  • no good seeding your product variable with 0
  • use an array to store the list of numbers
  • provide a way to break out of the input loop
  • in bash, the == operator within [[ ... ]] is a pattern matching operator.
  • you don't actually use your function return values anywhere, so I removed them
  • to declare a function, you don't need to use both the "function" keyword and the parentheses
  • use read -p to provide the prompt
  • use arithmetic expressions more widely
  • to assign a variable, don't use $ on the left-hand side.
  • to get the value, you must use $
  • let the system use upper-case variable names, you don't want to accidentally overwrite PATH for example.
  • avoid writing temp files unless you really need them (for logging or auditing)
  • printf re-uses the format string until all the arguments are consumed. this is very handy for printing the contents of an array.
  • semi-colons are optional
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I learned something from your answer: I didn't know you could use += to add an array element. –  Barmar Sep 27 '13 at 18:02
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If you run this script stand-alone, you have to end your input with CTRL-d. Here are the problems:

VARPRODUCTEVENS=0 

has to be

VARPRODUCTEVENS=1

or your product will always be zero.

echo numbers > $TMPDIR/$$.temp

Seems to have no useful purpose. You are putting the string "numbers" into the file. If you use $numbers it still appears to have no purpose. You would be putting the single last number from the read into the file. From the use "number" may be a better name than "numbers"

    $VARPRODUCTEVENS=$(($VARPRODUCTEVENS * $1))

and

    $VARSUMODDS=$(($VARSUMODDS + $1))

has to be

    VARPRODUCTEVENS=$(($VARPRODUCTEVENS * $1))

and

    VARSUMODDS=$(($VARSUMODDS + $1))

Having $VARSUMODDS on the left of the assignment will try to assign to the variable named "1" (the value of $VARSUMODDS).

There is no call to reduce, so you see no results. I assume you want that at the end.

Your return statements are unnecessary, and probably not doing what you intended. You are basically setting the exit status, and non-zero implies failure.

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