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I have a function that needs to return a pointer to an array:

int * count()
{
    static int myInt[10] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};
    return &myInt[10];
}

inside my main function I want to display one of the ints from that array, like here at index 3

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{   
    int myInt2[10] = *count();

    std::cout << myInt2[3] << "\n\n";
    return 0;
}

this however gives me the error: "Array initializer must be an initializer list"

how do I create an array within my main function that uses the pointer to get the same elements as the array at the pointer?

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use vector or std::array instead –  taocp Sep 27 '13 at 19:33
1  
Arrays and pointers are EQUIVALENT but not the same. See the C FAQ: c-faq.com/aryptr/aryptrequiv.html –  kfsone Sep 27 '13 at 19:40
    
Dude, I don't mean this to be patronising at all, but this code is flawed for so many reasons. Really the best thing to do is to read a book. I'd recommend the C programming language (Kernighan & Ritchie); which has the best explanation of pointers I've ever come across and is equally applicable to C++ in this respect. You'd know by the end of the chapter on pointers why int myInt[10] = *count() cannot possibly do what you want it to do. –  Bathsheba Sep 27 '13 at 19:41
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A few problems in your code:

1) you need to return a pointer to the beginning of the array in count:

return &myInt[0];

or

return myInt; //should suffice.

Then when you initialize myInt2:

int* myInt2 = count();

You can also copy one array into the other:

int myInt2[10];
std::copy(count(), count()+10, myInt2);

Note copying will create a second array using separate memory than the first.

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This might be what the OP needs, but it doesn't answer precisely the question asked. The OP wants an array in his main function and in his other function. So at some point the array elements must be copied from one array to the other. –  john Sep 27 '13 at 19:43
    
Good Comment, I added a note of copying the array into a new one. –  pippin1289 Sep 27 '13 at 20:03
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You don't need pointers, references are fine.

int (&count())[10]
{
    static int myInt[10] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};
    return myInt;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{   
    int (&myInt2)[10] = count();

    std::cout << myInt2[3] << "\n\n";
    return 0;
}
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