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i have a date $time2 and want to increment by one month up to 07/01/2015 (07/0/2015, 07/03/2015, 07/04/2015, ...).

increment by one day works fine:

$t2 = strftime( "%m/%d/%Y", localtime( $time2 + 24 * 3600));   # 07/01/2013

increment by one month i have an error:

my $t02 = strftime( "%m/%d/%Y", localtime( $time2 + 0 * 3600));  
my @t22 = ($t02 =~ m|(\d{2})/(\d{2})/(\d{4})| );  
$t22[1]++;      
$t2 = $t22[0]."/".$t22[1]."/".$t22[1];

have errorMonth '-1' out of range 0..11 how to fix it? codei HERE

share|improve this question
    
Can you just paste the value of $time2 as is? What you are trying to achieve here? Mention sample input and desired output. People may suggest smarter approach to solve it, rather than just correcting your error. – jkshah Sep 27 '13 at 20:06
    
The code you posted that not issue that error (or any output whatsoever (after adding the missing use POSIX qw( strftime );)). That error comes from timelocal or timegm, which you didn't use. Please provide code that actually demonstrates your error – ikegami Sep 27 '13 at 20:20
    
Note that not all days have 24 hours. 24 * 3600 will not always work. You should use something like DateTime – ikegami Sep 27 '13 at 20:27
    
@jkshah: $time2 is not a human readable date value ( 1690948800 ) that is why i am using localtime to format it – mamesaye Sep 27 '13 at 20:35
    
@mamesaye I got it from use of localtime. I didn't want to read it. I want to try your code at my end and needed to give that same input. Thanks! – jkshah Sep 27 '13 at 20:38

I'd probably do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;
use POSIX qw(strftime mktime);

my $time2 = 1690948800;

my @parts = localtime $time2;

$parts[4]++; # increment month

print strftime('%m/%d/%Y', localtime $time2), "\n";
print strftime('%m/%d/%Y', localtime mktime @parts), "\n";

But Time::Piece is pretty handy, too.

share|improve this answer
    
it is working partially... february is skipped!? goes from january to march. $VAR1 = 't2 : 01/30/2021'; $VAR1 = 't2 : 03/02/2021 – mamesaye Sep 27 '13 at 21:31
2  
What date in January are you using? Would you have wanted (the last day in February) or (February 30th, 2021)? That's probably a good argument for using Time::Piece or DateTime. Dates are tricky. – Jim Davis Sep 27 '13 at 21:40
    
Thanks, will git it a try – mamesaye Sep 27 '13 at 21:45
    
DateTime worked for me. my $dt = DateTime->new( year => $tval22[0], month => $tval22[1], day => $tval22[2] ); $dt->add( months => 1, end_of_month => 'limit' ); Thanks again – mamesaye Oct 1 '13 at 18:01

Here code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use integer;

sub udt2st {
    my $t = shift;
    my ($y, $m, $d) = (localtime($t))[5, 4, 3]; $y += 1900; $m++;
    return [$y * 10000 + $m * 100 + $d, $y, $m, $d];
};

my $starttime = time();
my ($yyyymmdd, $y, $m, $d) = @{&udt2st($starttime)};
while ($yyyymmdd < 20150701) {
    #
    print sprintf(qq/%s %04d-%02d-%02d\n/, $yyyymmdd, $y, $m, $d); # working stuff here
    #
    my $il = (($y + 3) % 4 / 3) >> (($y + 99) % 100 / 99); # is leap?
    my $md = 30 + (($m + $m / 8) % 2) - (($m + 9) % 12) / 11 * (2 - $il); # max. day in this month
    $starttime += (($md - $d) + $d) * 86400;
    ($yyyymmdd, $y, $m, $d) = @{&udt2st($starttime)};
};
share|improve this answer

I'd opt for a shorter version using bash

for m in {0..12}; do date -ud "01/07/2015 +$m month" +"%m/%d/%Y"; done

The result gives 13 date strings, each on its own line. You can use $time2 and collect the output into perl using backticks. Here's a sample from the output:

01/07/2015 02/07/2015 ... 01/07/2016

The problem that you mention happens when 'date' is trying to calculate a day one month away from the 30th of January. Here's an example

for m in {0..12}; do date -ud "01/30/2015 +$m month" +"%m/%d/%Y"; done

01/30/2015 03/02/2015 03/30/2015 04/30/2015 .... 12/30/2015 01/30/2016

There will still be 13 date strings listed, but the second and third ones state a date in March. This is since March 2nd is one month away from January 30th and March 30th is two months away from January 30th.

That's life

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this solution does not work on systems where date implements only the POSIX set of options. For example, on FreeBSD 9 there are just usage errors with this line. – Slaven Rezic Oct 17 '13 at 9:06
    
Well, on freeBSD the date command has a different prototype. Here's the command you should invoke: for m in {0..12}; do date -v7d -v1m -v2015y -v+${m}m +'%m/%d/%Y'; done – superk Mar 11 '15 at 10:33

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