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Is it possible in C++ to iterate through a Struct or Class to find all of its members? For example, if I have struct a, and class b:

struct a
{
  int a;
  int b;
  int c;
}

class b
{
  public:
    int a;
    int b;
  private:
    int c;
}

Would it be possible to loop them to say get a print statement saying "Struct a has int named a, b, c" or "Class b has int named a, b, c"

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10  
No reflection in C++. –  chris Sep 27 '13 at 20:03
    
Not in general. If you've left debugging information in the program, a debugger can give you that information, and you might be able to use certain libraries/APIs to inspect your own binary, but that's going to be less fun than, well, pretty much anything... –  twalberg Sep 27 '13 at 20:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are a couple of ways to do this, but you need to use some macros to either define or adapt the struct.

You can use the REFLECTABLE macro given in this answer to define the struct like this:

struct A
{
    REFLECTABLE
    (
        (int) a,
        (int) b,
        (int) c
    )
};

And then you can iterate over the fields and print each value like this:

struct print_visitor
{
    template<class FieldData>
    void operator()(FieldData f)
    {
        std::cout << f.name() << "=" << f.get() << std::endl;
    }
};

template<class T>
void print_fields(T & x)
{
    visit_each(x, print_visitor());
}

A x;
print_fields(x);

Another way is to adapt the struct as a fusion sequence (see the documentation). Here's an example:

struct A
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
};

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT
(
    A,
    (int, a)
    (int, b)
    (int, c)
)

Then you can print the fields as well using this:

struct print_visitor
{
    template<class Index, class C>
    void operator()(Index, C & c)
    {

        std::cout << boost::fusion::extension::struct_member_name<C, Index::value>::call() 
                  << "=" 
                  << boost:::fusion::at<Index>(c) 
                  << std::endl;
    }
};


template<class C>
void print_fields(C & c)
{
    typedef boost::mpl::range_c<int,0, boost::fusion::result_of::size<C>::type::value> range;
    boost::mpl::for_each<range>(boost::bind<void>(print_visitor(), boost::ref(c), _1));
}
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No, it's not possible, because there is no reflection in C++.

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6  
Answers should provide a solution to the problem. This should be a comment, not an answer. –  Captain Obvlious Sep 27 '13 at 20:29
5  
I'm not sure how this isn't an answer. He's telling the OP about a language limitation. This is about as answery as it gets. –  Tyler Jandreau Sep 27 '13 at 20:56
4  
@CaptainObvlious: Answers should answer the question. The answer to the question is "no". I mean, the answer could provide a whole mechanism to annotate a specific structure so that someone can iterate some data representing its fields, but that still doesn't iterate the fields of a struct, it iterates the fields of a specially-configured struct. –  Steve Jessop Sep 27 '13 at 21:59
2  
The answer to the question is not 'no'. You can easily iterate through the members of a struct and print them using standard C++: A a; printf(a.a); printf(a.b); printf(a.c);. There are plenty of ways to make the syntax more like the desired 'loop', using some kind of custom reflection mechanism. –  willj Sep 28 '13 at 22:07
1  
@willj: your code is not iteration by any sensible interpretation of the question (and it doesn't even print what the questioner asked for ;-p). And unless you can count on using debug info, custom reflection mechanisms only work on structures that have been somehow annotated, not on the example structures in the question and not on structures that you didn't define yourself. –  Steve Jessop Sep 30 '13 at 18:32

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