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I have table

test_A(
    id1 number,
    id2 number,
    id3 number,
    name varchar2(10),
    create_dt date
)

I have two indexes one composite index indx1 on (id1,id2) and indx2(id3). Now when I query this table test_A as

select * from test_A where id2=123 and 
create_dt=(select max(create_dt) from test_A where test_A.id2=id2);

I ran explain plan for this above SQL and it is using "index skip scan". If I create another index on create_dt then it using index fast full scan and over all cost and %cpu is showing higher than plan with Index skip scan. It is also using Index range scan after creating index on create_dt.

I could not come to conclusion which should be could? Do I need to create another Index on create_dt or is Index skip scan good? I believe Index skip is a feature of Oracle to run multiple index range scan?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I recommend you to familiarize yourself with this link: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E16655_01/server.121/e15858/tgsql_optop.htm#CHDFJIJA
It is Oracle 12c related, however it is very usefull to gain understanding how oracle uses different index access pathes in all DBMS versions.


Your subquery is ambigous:

select max(create_dt) from test_A where test_A.id2=id2

both test_A.id2 and id2 references to the same test_A.id2, and the query is equivalent to this:

select * from test_A where id2=123 and 
create_dt=(select max(create_dt) from test_A where id2=id2);

or simply:

select * from test_A where id2=123 and 
create_dt=(select max(create_dt) from test_A where id2 is not null);



I suppose that you want something like this:

select * from test_A where id2=123 and 
create_dt=(select max(create_dt) 
           from test_A ALIAS 
           where test_A.id2=ALIAS.id2);

For the above query a composite index on id2+create_dt most likely give the best results, try it:

CREATE INDEX index_name ON test_A( id2, create_dt);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for Above solution. I have created composite in index on those 2 columns which gave reduced cost in explain plan. I have one more question suppose i have unique constraint created on another table on (id1,id2) and do we need to have index created externally or does unique constraint take care of Index. I have read about this in many forums some saying it will take care of Index some syaing need to create Index , cannot come to conclusion on this. Please let me know if you have any info on this. – user2824874 Oct 1 '13 at 20:42
    
Just try it yourself. See this link: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/180be/1 there are three indentic tables there, first one without the index, second one with the index created using create index, and third with constraint .. unique inside the table definition. Run attached queries, and click on View execution plan links and compare indyvidual explain plans to see wich of them use the index. – kordirko Oct 1 '13 at 21:05
    
the link above is just what i needed! thank you! – Frank Fu Nov 13 '13 at 9:03

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