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I have a class that stores weak_ptrs in a container and later does something if the weak_ptr is not expired:

class Example
{
public:
    void fill(std::shared_ptr<int> thing)
    {
        member.push_back(thing);
    }
    void dosomething() const
    {
        for (const auto& i : member)
            if (!i.expired())
                ;// do something. the weak_ptr will not be locked
    }
private:
    std::vector<std::weak_ptr<int>> member;
};

If Example is an object that lives forever and fill is used regularily, the vector allocates memory for elements continously, but they are never removed after they expired.

Is there any automatic C++ way to get rid of the expired weak_ptrs in the container or is there a better way to store a variable number of them?

My naive way would be to iterate over the container each time fill is called and remove all the expired weak_ptrs. In scenarios where Example has many elements in the container and fill is frequently called this seems to be very inefficient.

share|improve this question
1  
You can use a custom deleter for the original shared_ptr that references the Example object and removes the pointer it is about to delete if it's in there. That way, you don't even need to store a weak_ptr. – Xeo Sep 27 '13 at 20:38
    
@Xeo Maybe I simplified my example a bit too much. In reality the container is a map that associates the weak_ptr to something. The Example class needs to know when and which of the objects are expired. – typ1232 Sep 27 '13 at 20:42
1  
The naive method may not be as bad as you think. If you have pointers that expire frequently, and you check for and purge those within fill before adding the new one, you may prevent vector reallocations because you just made room for the one you're about to add. Edit: Just saw your comment; what I said doesn't apply if the container is a map. Also, what @Xeo said works regardless of what type the container is. The customer deleter only needs to be able to look through the container to see whether it contains a copy of the pointer about to be deleted. – Praetorian Sep 27 '13 at 20:43
    
Add a second line if(member.size()%N==0)cleanup(); to fill() and only clean up on every N-th call? – Daniel Frey Sep 27 '13 at 20:45
    
@typ1232: What are you gonna do with an expired item? Also, the deleter can tell the Example object exactly that - and even exactly at the time an item has expired! – Xeo Sep 27 '13 at 20:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does the shared_ptr<int> have to be a shared_ptr<int>?

How about a shared_ptr<IntWrapper>?

#include <iostream>
#include <forward_list>
using namespace std;

class IntWrapper {
public:
    int i;

    static forward_list<IntWrapper*>& all() {
        static forward_list<IntWrapper*> intWrappers;
        return intWrappers;
    }
    IntWrapper(int i) : i(i)  {
        all().push_front(this);
    }
    ~IntWrapper() {
        all().remove(this);
    }
};

void DoSomething() {
    for(auto iw : IntWrapper::all()) {
        cout << iw->i << endl;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    shared_ptr<IntWrapper> a = make_shared<IntWrapper>(1);
    shared_ptr<IntWrapper> b = make_shared<IntWrapper>(2);
    shared_ptr<IntWrapper> c = make_shared<IntWrapper>(3);
    DoSomething();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is perfectly applicable to my case and I really like it! – typ1232 Sep 27 '13 at 21:25
    
It could actually be a shared_ptr<int> if you use shared_ptr aliasing (codesynthesis.com/~boris/blog/2012/04/25/…) – dalle Sep 27 '13 at 21:29
    
@typ1232 Just be aware that all().remove(this) removes by value and therefore has a complexity linear in the size of the container - which might be quite inefficient. If efficiency matters, you might want to consider other solutions like the one I posted. – Daniel Frey Sep 27 '13 at 22:12
    
Indeed it does. but unless this code is for a wrist watch, or the op is dealing with 10,000+ objects, it's unlikely to be a problem =) – bitwise Sep 27 '13 at 22:36

Since you clarified that you are actually using a std::map and not a std::vector, it might be easiest to remove the expired elements on-the-fly in doSomething(). Switch back from a range-based for loop to a normal iterator based design:

void dosomething() const
{
    auto i = member.begin();
    while( i != member.end() ) {
      if( i->expired() ) { i = member.erase( i ); continue; }
      ;// do something. the weak_ptr will not be locked
      ++i;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I would rather use a custom deleter for the shared_ptr. But this implies here to change the interface of the Example class. The advantage using custom deleter is that there is no need to check for expired objects in the collection. The collection is directly maintained by the custom deleter.

Quick implementation :

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <set>

template <typename Container>
// requires Container to be an associative container type with key type
// a raw pointer type
class Deleter {
    Container* c;
public:
    Deleter(Container& c) : c(&c) {}
    using key_type = typename Container::key_type;
    void operator()(key_type ptr) {
        c->erase(ptr);
        delete ptr;
    }
};

class Example {
public:
    // cannot change the custom deleter of an existing shared_ptr
    // so i changed the interface here to take a unique_ptr instead
    std::shared_ptr<int> fill(std::unique_ptr<int> thing) {
        std::shared_ptr<int> managed_thing(thing.release(), Deleter<containter_type>(member));
        member.insert(managed_thing.get());
        return managed_thing;
    }

    void dosomething() const {
        // we don't need to check for expired pointers
        for (const auto & i : member)
            std::cout << *i << ", ";

        std::cout << std::endl;
    }

    using containter_type =  std::set<int*>;
private:
    containter_type member;
};

int main()
{
    Example example;
    auto one = example.fill(std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(1)));
    auto two = example.fill(std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(2)));
    auto three = example.fill(std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3)));
    example.dosomething();
    three.reset();
    example.dosomething();
}
share|improve this answer

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