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#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)

{
    char F,C;

    printf("Do you have a Fever? y/n\n");
    F = getchar();

    printf("Do you have a runny nose or cough? y/n\n");
    C = getchar();


    printf("Here are the results you input:\n");
    printf("Do you have a fever?");
    putchar(F);

    printf("\nDo you have a runny nose or cough?");
    putchar(C);

    return 0;
}

The code inputs results from first getchar(); and then exits without waiting for more input. Why is that?

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3  
getchar() returns an int, not a char. Read its documentation (man getchar or equivalent) to see why. –  Keith Thompson Sep 27 '13 at 20:44
3  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Unlike some other Internet forums you may know, Stack Overflow is not a discussion site, nor is it homework help site. It is a question-and-answer site. Users such as yourself ask questions and other users attempt to answer them. What is your question? –  Robᵩ Sep 27 '13 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a while loop after each getchar() if you want to process only one character as;

printf("Do you have a Fever? y/n\n");
F = getchar();
while((F = getchar()) != EOF & F != '\n') // This will eat up all other char other characters
    ;

printf("Do you have a runny nose or cough? y/n\n");
C = getchar();
while((C = getchar()) != EOF & C != '\n')
    ;
share|improve this answer
    
And what if the user enters a blank line? Or worse, types ctrl-D or ctrl-Z or whatever the key is for EOF. –  Jim Balter Sep 28 '13 at 0:03

First, getchar() returns an int, not a char. This is so it can return any valid character (as a value 0..255 for systems where CHAR_BIT is 8) and a separate value (usually -1) as EOF.

Second, when users type an answer, the information contains the character (Y or N, you hope) plus a newline. There could be leading blanks; there could be trailing garbage.

So, your F probably gets the first character; the C reads the newline, not waiting for more input.

If you want to read lines and process each in turn, use fgets() to read the line and sscanf() to parse the result. Or use a function to encapsulate similar processing, such as the get_answer() function below.

#include <stdio.h>

int get_answer(void)
{
    int c;
    int answer = 0;
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n')
    {
        if (answer == 0 && (c == 'y' || c == 'n'))  // Upper-case?
            answer = c;
        /* ?check for garbage here and complain? */
    }
    return answer;
}

int main(void)
{
    int F,C;
    char line[4096];

    printf("Do you have a Fever? y/n\n");
    F = get_answer();

    printf("Do you have a runny nose or cough? y/n\n");
    C = get_answer();


    printf("Here are the results you input:\n");
    printf("Do you have a fever? %c\n", F);
    printf("Do you have a runny nose or cough? %c\n", C);

    return 0;
}

Note that newlines go at the end of outputs, in general. You could omit them from the prompt messages so that the input appears on the same line as the prompt in an interactive session. The calling code does not really handle EOF properly — where the uses triggers an EOF condition (by typing Control-D for example) before entering any data. The code in get_answer() is OK; the code in main() should test for a zero return.

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