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Partly for practice, and partly for personal use, I would like to be able to enter visual mode, select some lines, and then hit "," which would then toggle commenting. (I know NerdCommenter exists but I want something simple with nothing fancy - and again, this is practice, too.)

I've learned that you can do '&filetype' to access the filetype, and that '.' concatenates strings, ==# is case-sensitive string comparison, and =~ is regex matching. I also learned that getline('.') gets the line that visual mode has highlighted (each line if multiple lines are highlighted).

Here's my (flawed)

.vimrc

vnoremap , :call ToggleComment()<CR>
function! ToggleComment()
  "Choose comment string based on filetype.
  let comment_string = ''
  if &filetype ==# 'vim'
    let comment_string = '"'
  elseif &filetype ==# 'cpp'
    let comment_string = '\/\/'
  endif

  let line = getline('.')
  if line =~ '^' . comment_string
    "Comment.
    " How could I do the equivalent of "shift-I to go to the beginning of the
    " line, then enter comment_string"?
  else
    "Uncomment. This is flawed too. Maybe I should just go to the beginning of
    "the line and delete a number of characters over?
    execute 's/^' . comment_string . '//'
  endif
endfunction

One thing I get for the uncomment case, regardless of whether the line is commented or not, is

Pattern not found: ^"

(I tested on my vimrc file.)

Advice appreciated - I feel like this shouldn't be too complicated.

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As this is an exercise you may want to look into :h 'commentstring'. I would also suggest Tim Pope's commentary as a nice reference implementation. github.com/tpope/vim-commentary –  Peter Rincker Sep 27 '13 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the range option after function declatarion, that lets you use two variables that contain the beginning and end of the range, a:firstline and a:lastline.

Inside an execute instruction prepend them to the substitution command to executes it only in that range. At the time of removing apply escape() to the variable to avoid collision of forward slashes:

function! ToggleComment() range
    let comment_string = ''
    if &filetype ==# 'vim'
        let comment_string = '"' 
    elseif &filetype ==# 'cpp'
        let comment_string = '//'
    endif
    let line = getline('.')
    if line =~ '^' . comment_string
        execute a:firstline . "," . a:lastline . 's/^' . escape(comment_string, '/') . '//'
    else
        execute a:firstline . "," . a:lastline . 's/^/\=printf( "%s", comment_string )/'
    endif
endfunction

UPDATE: To add and remove comments just before first non-blank character, you have to add optional spaces after the zero-width assertion of beginning of line. This is the part that changes. Note how I add \s* to comparison if it exists comments in that line and add \1 or submatch(1) in the replacement part of substitutions:

if line =~? '^\s*' . comment_string
    execute a:firstline . "," . a:lastline . 's/^\(\s*\)' . escape(comment_string, '/') . '/\1/'
else
    execute a:firstline . "," . a:lastline . 's/^\(\s*\)/\=submatch(1) . printf( "%s", comment_string )/'
endif
share|improve this answer
    
Okay I think I understand this. So you pass 'execute' the range, kind of like the line numbers when you do :12,14s/a/b to swap all a's to b's in lines 12 to 14. Cool. I also didn't know about the printf - thanks for that. –  dmonopoly Sep 27 '13 at 21:37
    
How would you make the comment symbol appear indented properly with each line? So if this was done on a single line, the comment string would appear indented 2x if the line of the code indented 2x? –  dmonopoly Sep 27 '13 at 21:44
    
@dmonopoly: Do you mean to insert comments just before first non-blank character of the line? –  Birei Sep 27 '13 at 21:49
    
Yeah, just before the non-blank character, with a space between the [// or "] and the character... –  dmonopoly Sep 28 '13 at 0:28
    
@dmonopoly: Updated. –  Birei Sep 28 '13 at 9:38

This probably fails, because your :s command doesn't find the comment string. You should probably use the e flag to your :s command (See also :h s_flags).

Additionally, I think you want to add a variable number of spaces between the line start and the comment string, e.g. something like if line =~ '^\s*'.comment so it does correctly catch:

#This is a comment
     #This is a comment

etc, you'll get the idea.

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