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I am working with a very poorly documented javascript API, and need to write callback functions where the arguments have not been documented. As an opening step, I need to inspect what gets passed in. If I know that there's only one input I can set the callback function to be

function( stuff ){
    console.log(stuff);
}

and work from there. Is there an elegant way to inspect inputs when I don't know how many there are? I could do something like

function(a,b,c,d,e,f){
    console.log(a) 
    console.log(b) // is this undefined?
    console.log(c) // how about now?
      ....
    console.log(f) // if this isn't undefined I need to do it again with more args
}

and it will work fine, but it's pretty ugly. Is there a simpler way to find out how many argumetns have been passed to a function?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Loop the arguments object:

function f(){
    for(var prop in arguments) {
        console.log(arguments[prop]);
    }
}
f(1); // logs 1
f(1, 2); // logs 1, then 2

As arguments is an array-like object, you can also iterate it with a regular for loop, based on its length property:

for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++) {
    console.log(arguments[i]);
}
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1  
What do you mean? Aren't the property names on arguments precisely their indexes? –  bfavaretto Sep 27 '13 at 22:08

It looks like you are after arguments, which gives you an array of the arguments passed to the current function:

var f = function() {
    console.log(arguments);
}
f(1, '2');
f(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

(Fiddle)

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Use arguments

function unknown() {
  for (var i=0;i<arguments.length;i++) {
    console.log('arg '+i+' : ',arguments[i]);
   }
}

unknown(123, 'test', [1, 2, 3]);


arg 0 :  123
arg 1 :  test
arg 2 :  [1, 2, 3] 
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