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I apologize if I haven't properly searched every possible post on this but all seem a little different and I'm starting to get crossed eyed looking at this.

The following bash code is what I have so far.

for server in `cat serverlist2.txt`; do ssh -q $server 
    if ! ps -ef | grep -q http ; then 
        echo $server
    fi
done

I'm new to bash scripting and I have to find all the hosts listed in the file serverlist2.txt that run apache (http) and then print the hostnames where http is found. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Update 9/29/13

for server in `cat serverlist2.txt`; do
    ssh -q $server "ps -ef | grep http |grep -v grep && echo $server | wc -l"
done      

Made above changes and here is the output.

bash-3.00# bash serverlist.sh  
resin  9900   612   0   Jul 30 ? 0:00 perl /usr/local/resin-pro-3.0.25/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.c 1      
resin 18053   641   0   Jul 30 ?  0:00 perl /usr/local/resin-pro-3.0.25/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.c 1  
resin  1768   589   0   Apr 10 ? 0:00 perl /var/resin/wss-stg/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.caucho.ser 1  
resin  8568 13119   0   Sep 23 ?  0:00 perl /usr/local/resin-pro-3.0.25/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.c   1  
resin  1062   776   0   Sep 16 ?  0:00 perl /usr/local/resin-pro-3.0.25/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.c 1  
resin  3539  8290   0   Jul 13 ?  0:00 perl /usr/local/resin-pro-3.0.25/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.c 1  
resin 29900  3391   0   Sep 23 ?  0:00 perl /var/resin/wss-prod/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.caucho.se 1  
resin 21323  8547   0   Sep 23 ?  0:00 perl /var/resin/wss-prod/bin/wrapper.pl -chdir -name httpd -class com.caucho.se 1  
bash-3.00#  
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1 Answer 1

I think you wanted to do something like this:

while read server; do
    ssh -q $server "ps -ef | grep http | grep -v grep >/dev/null && echo $server"
done < serverlist2.txt

That is, for each server in the list:

  • Get the list of all process with ps -ef
  • Filter by the term "http"
  • Exclude any matching grep http lines, but without printing out anything
  • If there was a match, echo the name of the server

That said... grepping the process list for "http" is not very accurate, you might get false positives. A better solution would be to use some sort of status command instead. For example, in Debian systems, you can check the status of the apache2 like this:

service apache2 status

This will exit with 0 (= success) if the server is running and 1 (= failure) if not running. Using this the script becomes:

while read server; do
    ssh -q $server "service apache2 && echo $server"
done < serverlist2.txt

If you have mixed systems, some Debian, some RedHat, some Solaris, etc, then the method to check the status maybe different from server to server. You could work around that by creating a script, let's call it httpstatus.sh that has intelligence to determine the type of system it is running on (based on uname, for example), and act as a common wrapper, exiting with 0 if the web server is running and 1 if not running. Then the script becomes:

while read server; do
    ssh -q $server "httpstatus.sh && echo $server"
done < serverlist2.txt
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2  
or ssh -q $server '/etc/init.d/apache2 status' –  inselberg Sep 28 '13 at 2:30
    
I should mention that its a sun OS 10.. Using service throws an except command service not found. –  syed ashfaq Sep 28 '13 at 17:46
    
not quite. The first one throws a error using grep -q command. So I removed it and it just completed without any output.. –  syed ashfaq Sep 28 '13 at 18:07
    
It doesn't show any output. It should show some servers. –  syed ashfaq Sep 28 '13 at 18:35
    
I want to output the hostname only though. Any ideas? –  syed ashfaq Sep 29 '13 at 22:22

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