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I'm reading a text file (written on a UNIX or Linux machine) that is supposed to have one entry on each line. When I read it with my program and output the file contents to the console every other entry has an extra line break and each line is repeated twice. Here is the code

FILE* fullList;
char sline[21];
fullList = fopen("fullList", "r");
if(fullList == NULL)
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
while(fgets(sline, sizeof(sline), fullList) != NULL)
{
    puts(sline);
    printf(sline);
}
fclose(fullList);

So if the input file contains

apple
banana
orange
zucchini
cucumber
eggplant

the program would display it as

apple

apple
banana

banana
orange

orange
zucchini

zucchini
cucumber

cucumber
eggplant
eggplant

I'm not sure what's doing it. Must I some how clear sline before using it again?

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Note that using printf(sline) is danerous if sline contains any % symbols, you are very vulnerable to crashing as printf() tries to access arguments you didn't pass to it. Use: printf("%s", sline) instead; that's safe. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '13 at 4:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's because you print each line twice - once through puts, and once through printf.

fgets captures newline \n, and puts appends a '\n' of its own, so there's an additional line break after the first printout.

The last line in the file ("eggplant") lacks the trailing '\n', so there's no extra blank line in between the two eggplant printouts.

To fix this problem, first stop calling one of the printing functions. Next, make sure that the line you read does not have a \n at the end. You could either strip it off yourself, or use

while (fscanf(fulllist, "%20s", sline) == 1) {
    ...
}

It is not advisable to call printf with your string in the spot of the formal parameter, because having unexpected format symbols there may lead to undefined behavior. If you decide to use printf, use it as follows:

printf("%s\n", sline);
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Strange I got rid of the fputs() and it fixed everything, including the extra line breaks. –  Celeritas Sep 28 '13 at 2:38
    
@Celeritas There should be no line break after the last line (i.e. eggplant), right? –  dasblinkenlight Sep 28 '13 at 2:45

What do you think this does?

puts(sline);
printf(sline);

The first one prints the line (followed by a newline!). The second one prints the line, but formats anything starting with % in a special way. So puts() gives you an extra newline, but printf() is even worse--look up the documentation and think about what would happen if your file contains "%s" or "%d".

So you want to use only a single output statement, and you don't want double newlines. You could remove the newline from each line before printing, but even better is to use fputs(sline, stdout) which does not add a newline.

As an aside, a bit of advice: using C to process text files is going to be pretty painful for you (as a newcomer to C). I suggest using some other language, such as Python, Ruby, awk, sed, or anything else based on your needs and experience.

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