Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

23 has no pairs since 2 + 3 != 10

73 has 1 pair since 7 + 3 = 10

783436 has 3 pairs since 7 + 3, 7 + 3, 6 + 4 = 10

I'm trying to use recursion to solve this. Here are my base cases:

  if n < 10:
        return 0
  if n >= 10 and n <= 99:
        if n % 10 + n // 10 == 10:
            return 1
        else:
            return 0

But the recursive step is eluding me.

share|improve this question
    
You mean 2 + 3 = 5 != 10 –  arshajii Sep 28 '13 at 2:48
    
4 + 3 + 3 is not a pair, it is a triplet. –  mbeckish Sep 28 '13 at 2:49
3  
Why use recursion and complicate things when it can be done using a loop? –  hrv Sep 28 '13 at 2:49
1  
Come up with a solution using a loop, then figure out how to implement the loop with recursion. –  mbeckish Sep 28 '13 at 2:55
1  
In the example you gave: 783436 you counted twice 7+3 so it's either a mistake or you meant finding all the ordered pairs –  alfasin Sep 28 '13 at 2:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a wonderful solution if you're using recursion in Python:

def ten_maker(some_number=str):

    # Base case
    if len(some_number) == 1:
        return

    # Comparing first item to the rest to see if it adds up to 10
    for var in some_number[1:]:
        if int(some_number[0]) + int(var) == 10:
            print(some_number[0], var)

    # Doing the same with the rest, and slowly finishing the string
    return ten_maker(some_number[1:])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    ten_maker("783436")
share|improve this answer

You'll notice one of the solutions gives an O(n2) complexity solution. You can actually write an algorithm which runs in O(n). Here is how it's done:

(1) Run through the digits and count up all of the 1's, 2's, ... 9's.

int[] A = new int[] {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
String numStr = "783436";
for(char c: numStr.toCharArray())
    A[c - '0'] += 1;

(2) Only certain pairs add to give you 10, {1,9}, {2,8}, {3,7}, {4,6}, {5,5}. Using this information sum up the pairs:

int pairs = A[1]*A[9] + A[2]*A[8] + A[3]*A[7] + A[4]*A[6] + A[5]*A[5];

(NOTE: you multiply counts because, as stated in the question, pairs don't have to be unique)


As an example take 783436 (note: this isn't actual code, I'm just trying to illustrate):

//The counts for digits 1 - 9
A = {0, 0, 2, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0}

pairs = 0*0 + 0*1 + 2*1 + 1*1 + 0*0 = 3
share|improve this answer

If you don't care about the fact that you're counting 7+3 twice (since 3 appears twice in the sequence of digits), then you can do as follows (written in Java):

// a helper function that takes a number and returns an array of digits
static int[] numberToDigits(int number){
    char[] charNums = String.valueOf(number).toCharArray();
    int[] digits = new int[charNums.length];
    for(int i=0; i<charNums.length; i++){
        digits[i] = charNums[i]-48; // convert the char to int value
    }
    return digits;
}

// here's the algorithm that counts the pairs
static int count(int number){
    int[] digits = numberToDigits(number);
    int counter = 0;
    for(int i=0; i<digits.length; i++){
        for(int j=i+1; j<digits.length; j++){
            if(digits[i]+digits[j] == 10){
                counter += 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return counter;
}

public static void main(String...args){
    int tens = count(783436);
    System.out.println("tens = " + tens);
}

OUTPUT
tens = 3

share|improve this answer

Here is my solution without recrussion

code at online compiler


public static void main (String[] args)
{
    // add user input
    int SUM = 10;
    // add user input
    String numStr = "783436";

    int length = numStr.length();

    int numArray[] = new int[length];
    int numArrayNeed[] = new int[length];

    int temp=Integer.parseInt(numStr);
    int i=0;

    do
    {

        numArray[i] = temp % 10;
        temp = temp /10;

        numArrayNeed[i] = SUM - numArray[i];

        i++;

    }while(temp>0);

    for(int j=0;j<length;j++)
    {
        if(numStr.contains( String.valueOf(numArrayNeed[j]) ))
        {
            System.out.println(": " + numArrayNeed[j] + " & " + (10-numArrayNeed[j]) );
        }
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
You can add if-case optimization of output as per need . If feel this maybe more memory efficient than extensive looping –  Srinath Ganesh Sep 28 '13 at 4:31
    
for unique values you can simply add the greatest number of a pair (in 7&3 add 7 to list) and do needed formatting at output ( 7 & (10-7) ) –  Srinath Ganesh Sep 28 '13 at 4:33

Use below code which is of order n(optimum).

Take a global variable which will hold the occurrence of 0-9

private int[] countOfDigits = new int[10];

Use below method which will return the total number of pairs available.

int countPair(int num) {
    while (num > 0) {
        countOfDigits[num % 10]++;
        num /= 10;
    }

    return ((countOfDigits[1] * countOfDigits[9])
            + (countOfDigits[2] * countOfDigits[8])
            + (countOfDigits[3] * countOfDigits[7])
            + (countOfDigits[4] * countOfDigits[6]) + (countOfDigits[5]
        * (countOfDigits[5] - 1) / 2));
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.