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I have to copy the content of file1 into a buffer (of size 23 bytes), then, I have to copy data from the buffer to file2.

I have trouble to make sure that file1 is entirely copied into the buffer. When the buffer is copied to file2, file2 contents only part of the content of file1, and the output says that only 4 bytes of data have been copied into file2.

I tried to figure out what I did wrong, but I have no luck so far. Your help will be very appreciated.

I am using Oracle VM VirtualBox, where I have Ubuntu installed.

I am also using make (MakeFile) to update all files at once on the command prompt.

My code is below in C/POSIX.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define  My_Full_Name "AAA!"

int PrintSentence()
{

  size_t buffersize = (size_t) (4 * 5.75);  //or (4 bytes * 5.75) = 23 bytes
  char buffer[buffersize];
  char source_file[200];
  char destination_file[200];

  ssize_t bytes_read;

  int fdSource, fdDestination;

  mode_t mode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR;

  printf("Welcome to File Copy by %s\n", My_Full_Name);

  printf("Enter the name of the source file: ");

  scanf("%s", source_file);

  printf("Enter the name of the destination file: ");

  scanf("%s", destination_file);

  fdSource = open(source_file, O_RDONLY);

  if (fdSource < 0)
  {
    perror("Open failed!!");
    return 1;
  }

  else
  {

    bytes_read = read(fdSource, buffer, sizeof(buffer));

    fdDestination = open(destination_file, O_CREAT | O_WRONLY | mode);

    if (fdDestination < 0)
    {
      perror("Oups!! cannot create file again!!");

      return 1;
    }
    else
    {
      write(fdDestination, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
      printf("current content of buffer: %s\n", buffer); //just to check
      printf("current value of buffer size = %zd  \n", buffersize); //just to check
      printf("File copy was successful, with %d byte copied\n", fdDestination); //the output says only 4 bytes are copied

    }

  }

  return;

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here:

printf("File copy was successful, with %d byte copied\n", fdDestination );

fdDestination is a file descriptor, it's not the number of bytes written. 0, 1 and 2 are your three standard streams, 3 will be your input file which is opened first, so 4 will be your output file, that's why it's always outputting 4.

You want to save the return value from write(), and use the value of that instead (after checking that return value for errors, of course, which you should be doing for read() as well).

EDIT: Slightly modifying your code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define  My_Full_Name "AAA!"

int main(void) {
    size_t buffersize = (size_t) (4 * 5.75);
    char buffer[buffersize];
    char source_file[200];
    char destination_file[200];

    ssize_t bytes_read, bytes_written;
    int fdSource, fdDestination;

    mode_t mode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR;

    printf("Welcome to File Copy by %s\n", My_Full_Name);
    printf("Enter the name of the source file: ");
    scanf("%s", source_file);

    printf("Enter the name of the destination file: ");
    scanf("%s", destination_file);

    fdSource = open(source_file, O_RDONLY);

    if (fdSource < 0) {
        perror("Open failed!!");
        return 1;
    } else {
        bytes_read = read(fdSource, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
        fdDestination = open(destination_file, O_CREAT | O_WRONLY | mode);

        if (fdDestination < 0) {
            perror("Oups!! cannot create file again!!");
            return 1;
        } else {
            bytes_written = write(fdDestination, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
            printf("current content of buffer: %s\n", buffer);
            printf("current value of buffer size = %zd  \n", buffersize);
            printf("File copy was successful, with %d byte copied\n",
                    bytes_written);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

gives me this:

paul@local:~/src/c/fpc$ cat infile
12345678901234567890123
paul@local:~/src/c/fpc$ ./fpc
Welcome to File Copy by AAA!
Enter the name of the source file: infile
Enter the name of the destination file: outfile
current content of buffer: 12345678901234567890123
current value of buffer size = 23
File copy was successful, with 23 byte copied
paul@local:~/src/c/fpc$ cat outfile; echo ""
12345678901234567890123
paul@local:~/src/c/fpc$
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It fixed the correct number of bytes copied as you suggested. But I still don't have the entire content of file1 into to the buffer, and into file2. –  T4000 Sep 28 '13 at 6:16
    
Are you checking the returns from read() and write() to check how many bytes they're actually reading and writing? And your input file is exactly 23 bytes long, right? –  Paul Griffiths Sep 28 '13 at 6:19
    
Yes, I did check the return of read() and write() and both return 23 bytes. I realized that file1 and file2 are bigger than the buffer. So it makes sense that I will have only part of the file (up to 23 bytes). Thanks for your help! –  T4000 Sep 28 '13 at 6:58
    
No problem. Some kind of loop would seem to be in order if you want to copy the rest of it. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 28 '13 at 7:00
    
Quick question: if the file is really small, like 1 to 2 characters, how can you make sure that read() and write() return exactly the same value? I have struggle to have the same return value for very small file. –  T4000 Sep 29 '13 at 0:36

How can you expect that a file will be entirely written into the buffer when your buffer is but 23 bytes long? With call to read you are reading only 23 bytes and leave the rest of the contents of the file1 untouched. Or, do is it your expected behaviour that your program should copy only 23 bytes of its contents to the target file?

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