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I am trying to declare and initialize an array with 0, in javascript. I created an array and set the length like this.

var previousRow = [];
previousRow.length = 5;

Then, I did this.

console.log(previousRow);
previousRow = previousRow.map(Number.prototype.valueOf, 0);
console.log(previousRow);

and I got,

[ , , , ,  ]
[ , , , ,  ]

But, when I did

console.log(previousRow);
previousRow = Array.apply(null, previousRow).map(Number.prototype.valueOf, 0);
console.log(previousRow);

I got what I expected

[ , , , ,  ]
[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ]

Why the first code didn't work?

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2  
See related: stackoverflow.com/q/18947892/617762 –  Zirak Sep 28 '13 at 8:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Read the MDN documentation for map. It clearly states:

callback is invoked only for indexes of the array which have assigned values; it is not invoked for indexes which have been deleted or which have never been assigned values.

The previousRow array is an empty array of length 5. However the elements have never been assigned a value:

var previousRow = [];
previousRow.length = 5;

Since the elements of previousRow have never been assigned a value they will never be processed by map. Hence mapping Number.prototype.valueOf over previousRow will result in an empty array of 5 elements:

console.log(previousRow);
previousRow = previousRow.map(Number.prototype.valueOf, 0);
console.log(previousRow);

However when you apply previousRow to the Array constructor the constructor creates a new array and assigns the values of previousRow to the new array.

It doesn't matter whether the elements of previousRow were assigned a value. When JavaScript can't find a value it supplies undefined instead.

Hence the net effect is that the new array has 5 elements all of which are assigned undefined explicitly by the Array constructor. Hence you can use map to process the entire array:

console.log(previousRow);
previousRow = Array.apply(null, previousRow).map(Number.prototype.valueOf, 0);
console.log(previousRow);

You should read the following answer for a more in depth explanation: http://stackoverflow.com/a/18949651/783743

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Your explanation was great and the link you provided was awesome. Thanks a lot. :) –  thefourtheye Sep 28 '13 at 14:28

Array.prototype.map checks that the property actually has been initalised using an assignment or literal (reference).

Changing the length of the array does not actually define properties for each element with an index less than the length, therefore map() will not apply the logic to the array that was expected.

Since changing the length does nothing to the array except affecting other functions that rely on the length property being accurate, you'll need to actually define your array elements.

Function.prototype.apply however, does not check for whether it is actually defined, simply the length. It loops through each of them, and attempts to get the value for each index below the length. Remember if you access a property that does not exist on an object or array, it will return undefined.

The Array constructor returns an array that has all elements below the length of the arguments array initialised, making 5 defined elements being passed to map(), which will work properly as you intended.

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Your answer is tangential to the question. –  Aadit M Shah Sep 28 '13 at 8:36
    
I don't see how this answer was tangential, but I've removed some of the cruft that might not have made my answer that clear. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 19 at 10:38

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