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Is there a lightweight pattern to cancel long runing method, wich replaces code like this:

public void longComputations() {
   ... first step...
   if ( cancelled ) {
      rollbackWork();
      return;
   }
   ... second step...
   if ( cancelled ) {
      rollbackWork();
      return;
   }
   ... third step...
   if ( cancelled ) {
      rollbackWork();
      return;
  }
}

I know that I can make a Task class, subdivide steps to task objects, make a queue and just do tasks step by steps in loop with cancelation checking, but I'm just wondering is there any simple code-structure pattern for sush situation.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am not aware of such a mechanism. Since you have to track your work in order to be able to perform rollbackWork(), a well-designed object-oriented solution is your best choice anyway, if you want to further evolve this logic! Typically, such a scenario could be implemented using the command pattern, which I still find pretty lightweight:

// Task or Command
public interface Command {
    void redo();
    void undo();
}

A scheduler or queue could then take care of executing such task / command implementations, and of rolling them back in order.

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2  
+1 GoF command pattern –  Ortwin Angermeier Sep 28 '13 at 11:55
    
I will accept due to enough time period. But propably the real answer is "No, there is not a simple code structure for that". Your solution is a little bit heavyweight (as I said subdivide steps to task objects) for very small process, but I think that is a lot better practice that involving thread exteptions/thread interruption. –  killer_PL Sep 30 '13 at 7:44
    
@killer_PL: Yes, using threads might overly complicate the task... –  Lukas Eder Sep 30 '13 at 7:48

How about this edit, not a pattern though? Exceptions are very cheap, so it should be fast.

public void caller(){
    try{
        longComputations();
    } catch (MeaningfulRuntimeException e){
        rollbackWork(e.getStep());
    }
}

public void longComputations() {
   ... first step...
   checkStatus(1);

   ... second step...
   checkStatus(2);

   ... third step...
   checkStatus(3);
}

public void checkStatus(int step){
    if ( cancelled ) {
        ... we may rollback here or throw an exception ...
        throw MeaningfulRuntimeException(step);
    }
}
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If the steps call methods which throw InterruptedException then you can use Thread.interrupt(). You will still need to maintain enough state information to do the rollback properly.

If the steps cannot be interrupted this way, you should not consider relying on the deprecated Thread.stop() mechanism since it is inherently unsafe.

It seems that either way it makes sense to do exactly what you described: encapsulate this workflow logic in a class independent of the computation steps. It should support cancellation and/or interruption and accept a bunch of tasks to be executed. Note that the tasks to be fed into the workflow should provide at least two methods: one to perform the computation and one to roll it back.

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You might want to consider using the java.util.concurrent package. You need to wrap your working steps as Callables (or Runnables).

public class InterruptibleTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) { try {
        final ExecutorService queue = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
        queue.submit(new Callable<Void>() { @Override public Void call() { busyWait(1000); return null; } });
        queue.submit(new Callable<Void>() { @Override public Void call() { busyWait(1000); return null; } });
        queue.submit(new Callable<Void>() { @Override public Void call() { busyWait(1000); return null; } });
        final AtomicBoolean cancelled = new AtomicBoolean();
        new Thread() { @Override public void run() {
                try { Thread.sleep(1500); } catch (InterruptedException ex) { }
                queue.shutdownNow();
                cancelled.set(true);
            }
        }.run();
        if (cancelled.get()) { rollback(); }
        queue.shutdown();
        System.out.println("Finished");
    } catch (Exception ex) { ex.printStackTrace(System.err); } }

    public synchronized static void busyWait(int millis) {
        System.out.println("Start");
        long until = System.currentTimeMillis() + millis;
        while (System.currentTimeMillis() < until) { }
        System.out.println("Stopped");
    }
    public synchronized static void rollback() {
        System.out.println("Rollback!");
    }
}

Note that shutdownNow() might call interrupt() on the currently executing work thread. You will probably also need to synchronize your rollback() because shutdownNow() returns before non-interruptible code finishes execution.

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new Thread(...).run()? –  assylias Sep 28 '13 at 21:26

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