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I was thinking about writing generic functions for basic Math operations such as Min, Max etc. But i i dont know how to compare two generic types :

public T Max<T>(T v1, T v2) where T: struct
{
   return (v1 > v2 ? v1 : v2);
}

How about that?

Thank you.

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1  
ps. Why limit Max to struct's? It can be equally useful for classes, eg. strings. –  Will Dec 15 '09 at 10:46
1  
Generally for anything that implements IComparable. –  Joey Dec 15 '09 at 10:47
    
You are right, i did not know about IComparable interface. TY. –  Feryt Dec 15 '09 at 10:53
1  
Note: you can do this for anything that involves comparisons because of IComparable but other maths functions may be impossible as there is no INumeric interface or equivalent –  jk. Dec 15 '09 at 11:20
    
@jk - not impossible, just tricky; see the MiscUtil link in Luke's answer for code that supports the operators (rather than IComparable[<T>]). –  Marc Gravell Dec 15 '09 at 12:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you only want to create comparison functions then you could use the default comparer for the type T. For example:

public static T Max<T>(T x, T y)
{
    return (Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(x, y) > 0) ? x : y;
}

If T implements IComparable<T> then that comparer will be used; if T doesn't implement IComparable<T> but does implement IComparable then that comparer will be used; if T doesn't implement either IComparable<T> or IComparable then a runtime exception will be thrown.

If you want/need to do more than just compare the items then you could have a look at the generic operators implementation in MiscUtil and the related article.

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This is very elegant and generic solution. I like it too. –  Feryt Dec 15 '09 at 10:57
3  
This is the right answer, IMO. As an aside, a common alternative pattern is to have two overloads; one passes Comparer<T>.Default to the second, which accepts IComparer<T> (for the cases when you want to customise it). But for the simple case, this is the way to go. –  Marc Gravell Dec 15 '09 at 12:09
    
I disagree, se my post below –  Fernando Pelliccioni Nov 10 '13 at 23:23
    
This is indeed the best solution. There is negligible runtime costs associated with it (and it's paid only the very first time a default comparer is created for a type). The Default.Comparer is also smarter and will handle corner cases better than using IComparable or IComparable<T>. Nice solution. It's indeed almost exactly the way I do it. I just use >= 0 so that the first "operand" is returned in case they are equal in the sort order... –  Loudenvier Jul 6 at 19:58
    
If add constraint T : IComparable<T>, then the code can be simplified to return (x.CompareTo(y) > 0) .... Easier to read. And no run-time evaluation or exception risk, since you have restricted T to types that can be compared. –  ToolmakerSteve Oct 23 at 21:34

You probably want to constrain the generic types to implement IComparable:

public T Max<T>(T v1, T v2) where T: struct, IComparable<T>

and then use the CompareTo method:

{
    return (v1.CompareTo(v2) > 0 ? v1 : v2);
}
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Excellent, thank you. –  Feryt Dec 15 '09 at 10:55
    
@Feryt:Note that there's no need to constrain it to structs. –  Dario Dec 15 '09 at 11:04
1  
Well, the struct avoids the null problem, but IMO this is the wrong answer; Luke has the right of it. –  Marc Gravell Dec 15 '09 at 12:07

This is a little too late, but why not use dynamic types and delegates as an alternative to IComparable? This way you get compile-type safety in most cases and will only get a runtime error when the types supplied both do not support the operator < and you fail to provide the default comparer as an argument.

public static T Max<T>(T first, T second, Func<T,T,bool> f = null)
{
    Func<dynamic,dynamic,bool> is_left_smaller = (x, y) => x < y ? true : false;

    var compare = f ?? new Func<T, T, bool>((x, y) => is_left_smaller(x, y));

    return compare(first, second) ? second : first; 
}
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Let me disagree. The @LukeH's implementation is not Generic.

I will explain why it is not Generic:

Comparer<T>.Default involves inspecting T at run-time to determine if it implements IComparable<T>, IComparable or neither. Although this behavior is not well documented in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azhsac5f.aspx, we can deduct it because Comparer<T>.Default throws an exception when T does not implement neither. If the inspection was done at compilation-time there would be no need for an exception (runtime), with an compile-time error would suffice.

Then, as Comparer<T>.Default uses Reflection, this means a high cost on Run-Time, then...., It is NOT Generic... Why?

Because Generic Programming means: A single algorithm (Generic) can cover many implementations (for many types) maintaining efficiency of hand-written versions.

Take an example. The handwritten version for integers would be:

public static int Max( int x, int y)
{
    return (x.CompareTo(y) > 0) ? x : y;
}

It is very simple, involving only a comparison (or maybe more, depending on how Int32.CompareTo() is implemented). If we use the @LukeH's implementation, we are adding Reflection to something that is very simple.

In short:

  1. Always prefer Compilation-time errors to Run-Time Exceptions ( this is not Javascript, Ruby,... :-) )
  2. This implementation is less efficient compared to the handwritten version (for any type)

On the other hand. What do you think Max should return when x and y are equivalents?

I'm starting to analyze Real-Generic implementations....

The ideal implementation would be something like...

    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y, Func<T, T, int> cmp)
    {
        return (cmp(x, y) > 0) ? x : y;
    }

    //Pseudo-code ( note the 'or' next to 'where' )
    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y) where T: IComparable<T> or IComparable
    {
        return Max(x, y, (a, b) => { return a.CompareTo(b); });
    }

This is not possible in C#, the next try is could be...

    //pseudo-code
    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y, Func<T, T, int> cmp)
    {
        return (cmp(x, y) > 0) ? x : y;
    }

    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y) where T: IComparable<T>
    {
        return Max(x, y, (a, b) => { return a.CompareTo(b); });
    }

    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y) where T: IComparable
    {
        return Max(x, y, (a, b) => { return a.CompareTo(b); });
    }

But, this is neither possible, because overload resolution doesn't takes into account Generics Constraints....

Then, I'll leave out IComparable consciously. I'm just going to worry about IComparable<T>

    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y, Func<T, T, int> cmp)
    {
        return (cmp(x, y) > 0) ? x : y;
    }

    public static T Max<T>(T x, T y) where T: IComparable<T>
    {
        return Max(x, y, (a, b) => { return a.CompareTo(b); });
    }
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That's a good point about lack of compile-time type safety. But if you're going to make a claim about run-time cost, I'd really like to see you back it up with some numbers. I haven't tested it either, but I'd think passing a function would cause some performance penalty too. –  Carl Walsh Feb 8 at 0:46
    
@Carl Walsh. My point is not about type safety, but about Generic Programming. Comparer<T>.Default uses Reflection. It is well known that Reflection has a high cost in run-time, I think it is not necessary to prove it here. Especially if we compare Reflection with something that can be resolved at compile time, there is a huge difference in performance. Anyway, In a few days, I'll make an update with some numbers. –  Fernando Pelliccioni Feb 8 at 16:51
    
@Carl Walsh. Regarding passing a function as a parameter, first, the function that receives CMP as a parameter is necessary to compare a pair of elements with an equivalence relation. The second function compares two elements using equality. Second, regarding to the penalty of passing a function as a parameter, any reasonable compiler can do inlining of the CMP, so that the final code would be the same as if we had written A.CompareTo(b) by hand. –  Fernando Pelliccioni Feb 8 at 16:51
    
@FernandoPelliccioni your claim isn't entirely right. You should have taken a look at the source code for DefaultComparer. It is very smart! It will cache the default comparer in a static volatile variable of Comparer<T>. So you pay the price only once and after that it will be faster than (or as fast as) a typecast to IComparable<T>. Using DefaultComparer will make the function MORE "generic" than the "more academic" Comparable<T> solution. And you should not fear runtime exceptions. Compile time checking is no substitute for unit testing. Unit test your code and use the best solution. –  Loudenvier Jul 6 at 19:56

From memory, T also needs to be IComparable (add that to the where), and then you use v1.CompareTo(v2) > 0 etc.

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