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I am making a text based game on python 3.3.2 and want to have to have two questions after a random choice this is my code:

if attack_spider == "Y":
    attack = ['Miss', 'Miss', 'Miss', 'Miss', 'Hit']
    from random import choice
    print(choice(attack))
    messages = {
        "Miss": "You made the spider angry! The spider bites you do you attack it again? Y/N",
        "Hit": "You killed the spider! It's fangs glow red do you pick them up? Y/N!"
    }

    print(messages[choice(attack)])

I want to be able to have different questions depending on weather you hit or miss if I just put:

spider = input()
if spider == "Y":
    print("as you pick the fangs up the begin to drip red blood") 

it would should this even if you missed which has nothing to do with making the spider angry. it there a way of getting different answer depending on if you hit or miss.

I added the code from the answer below.

               if attack_spider == "Y":
                   attack = choice(attack)
                   attack = ['Miss', 'Miss', 'Miss', 'Miss', 'Hit']
                   from random import choice
                   print (choice(attack))
                   messages = {
                       "Miss": "You made the spider angry! The spider bites you do you attack it again? Y/N",
                       "Hit": "You killed the spider! It's fangs glow red do you pick them up? Y/N!"
                   }

                   print(messages[choice(attack)])
                   spider = input()
                   if spider == "Y":
                       if attack == "Hit":
                           print("As you pick the fangs up the begin to drip red blood")

                       if attack == "Miss":
                           print("As you go to hit it it runs away very quickly")

                   if spider == "N":
                       if attack == "Hit":
                           print("As you walk forward and turn right something flies past you")

                       if attack == "Miss":
                           print("The spider begins to bite harder and you beging to See stars")

I know get this error:

    Traceback (most recent call last):
      File "C:\Users\callum\Documents\programming\maze runner.py", line 29, in <module>
        attack = choice(attack)
    NameError: name 'choice' is not defined
share|improve this question
    
As a side note, it's recommended to do the imports at the beginning of the file. – Cristian Ciupitu Sep 28 '13 at 11:34
    
Although in a way it's nicer when the imports are where they are used; some languages (e.g. Scala) even encourages this: it has the advantage of keeping it clear what the import is for, and also that when the code gets removed or commented out, the so does the import. – Erik Allik Sep 28 '13 at 11:39
    
I have tried to solve this myself – dashernasher Sep 28 '13 at 11:53
    
@ErikAllik, thank you for the informative note about Scala, but PEP 8 says that "imports are always put at the top of the file, just after any module comments and docstrings, and before module globals and constants". – Cristian Ciupitu Sep 28 '13 at 20:27
    
@CristianCiupitu: thank you for the sarcasm, but I'm very well aware of what PEP8 thinks about it; that doesn't invalidate my the content of my remark though (especially because it started with "in a way ..."), unless you're a fanatic worshipper of PEP8. – Erik Allik Sep 29 '13 at 11:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your print(choice(attack)) needs to first assign to a variable:

hit_or_miss = random.choice(attack)
print(hit_or_miss)

And then you can do

if spider == "Y":
    if hit_or_miss == "Hit":
        print(...)

    if hit_or_miss == "Miss":
        print(...)

if spider == "N":
    if hit_or_miss == "Hit":
        print(...)

    if hit_or_miss == "Miss":
        print(...)

Since you already know dictionaries, this can also be done:

responses = {
    ("Y", "Hit"):  ...,
    ("Y", "Miss"): ...,
    ("N", "Hit"):  ...,
    ("N", "Miss"): ...
}

print(responses[spider, hit_or_miss])
share|improve this answer
    
I added the code but it does not show the text just closes the program – dashernasher Sep 28 '13 at 12:05
    
You didn't add the code from my post properly. Look particularly at the first code block from my post. – Veedrac Sep 28 '13 at 12:07
    
sorry but I still get an error – dashernasher Sep 28 '13 at 12:13
    
Ah, yeah, it's meant to be random.choice, not just choice. I'll update. – Veedrac Sep 28 '13 at 12:26
    
Note that your code won't work because of the order of operations. You define attack to be an element from attack before defining attack! Then you import random (which you need to have in order to use random.choice), then choose a different item to print! – Veedrac Sep 28 '13 at 12:28

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