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I'm trying to create a custom frame in tkinter, Python v2.7. I have done this just fine once (a frame with a scrollbar), but my second attempt isn't working. I compare it to the Frame that does work, and I can't understand what I have done differently.

What I want is a frame that has a little separator line underneath it, so I'm creating a "normal" frame, a thin frame to use as a separator under it, and a bigFrame to hold it.

Everything I create in the class works, except the frame itself. Hopefully my comments explain what is and isn't showing.

from Tkinter import *

class FunFrame(Frame):
    def __init__(self, master, lbl,  **kwargs):
        self.bigFrame = Frame(master) 
        Frame.__init__(self, self.bigFrame, width=280, height=200, bg="red", **kwargs)
        self.grid(row=0, column=0, pady=3) #this is in bigFrame, and doesn't display
                                    #however the padding is still respected
        self.separator = Frame(self.bigFrame, height=2, bd=1, width=280, relief = SUNKEN)
        self.separator.grid(row=1, column=0) #this is in bigFrame, and displays

        self.l = Label(self, text=lbl) #this is in self and doesn't display
        self.l.grid(row=0, column=0)


    def grid(self, **kwargs):
        self.bigFrame.grid(**kwargs)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    root=Tk()
    Frame1=FunFrame(root, "hello")
    Frame2=FunFrame(root, "world")
    Frame1.grid(row=0, column=0)
    Frame2.grid(row=1, column=0)
    root.mainloop()
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1 Answer 1

If you call self.grid in __init__, it calls your own grid, not Tkinter's version.

Try following (renamed grid to grid_):

from Tkinter import *

class FunFrame(Frame):
    def __init__(self, master, lbl,  **kwargs):
        self.bigFrame = Frame(master) 
        Frame.__init__(self, self.bigFrame, width=280, height=200, bg="red", **kwargs)
        self.grid(row=0, column=0, pady=3)
        self.separator = Frame(self.bigFrame, height=2, bd=1, width=280, relief=SUNKEN)
        self.separator.grid(row=1, column=0)

        self.l = Label(self, text=lbl)
        self.l.grid(row=0, column=0)

    def grid_(self, **kwargs): ######## grid -> grid_
        self.bigFrame.grid(**kwargs)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    root=Tk()
    Frame1 = FunFrame(root, "hello")
    Frame2 = FunFrame(root, "world")
    Frame1.grid_(row=0, column=0) ######## grid -> grid_
    Frame2.grid_(row=1, column=0) ######## grid -> grid_
    root.mainloop()

I'd rather code as follow (if '....' was used to represent hierarchy visually):

from Tkinter import *

class FunFrame(Frame):
    def __init__(self, master, lbl,  **kwargs):
        Frame.__init__(self, master)
        if 'inside outer frame (self)':
            innerFrame = Frame(self, width=280, height=200, bg="red", **kwargs)
            innerFrame.grid(row=0, column=0, pady=3)
            if 'inside inner frame':
                self.l = Label(innerFrame, text=lbl)
                self.l.grid(row=0, column=0)
            separator = Frame(self, height=2, bd=1, width=280, relief=SUNKEN)
            separator.grid(row=1, column=0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    root = Tk()
    Frame1 = FunFrame(root, "hello")
    Frame2 = FunFrame(root, "world")
    Frame1.grid(row=0, column=0)
    Frame2.grid(row=1, column=0)
    root.mainloop()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I don't understand your second bit of code though. Feel free to enlighten me as I am always keen to code better. –  WelshGandalf Sep 28 '13 at 21:03
    
@WelshGandalf, The second code treat FunFrame as outer frame. if '....' part is always executed because non-empty string are treated as True when used as predicates. –  falsetru Sep 29 '13 at 7:38

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