Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to output a 2D array to the console; I want the information in the array to be nicely formatted as shown in my desired output at the end of this question. My array is created as follows (instances are created of the FamilyMember class):

#family_members.rb

class FamilyMember

attr_accessor :name, :sex, :status, :age
def initialize (name, sex, type, role, age)
   @name = name
   @sex = sex
   @type = type
   @role = role
   @age = age
end

end

# Below, an array is created called fm; instances of the class are then instantiated within the array elements
fm = {}
fm[1] = FamilyMember.new('Andrew','Male', 'Child', 'Son' , '27' )
fm[2] = FamilyMember.new('Bill','Male', 'Parent', 'Father' , '63' )
fm[3] = FamilyMember.new('Samantha','Female', 'Parent', 'Mother' , '62' )
fm[4] = FamilyMember.new('Thomas','Male', 'Child', 'Dog' , '10' )
fm[5] = FamilyMember.new('Samantha', 'Female', 'Child', 'Dog' , '4' )

I want to be able to output the contents of the array to the console formatted as a string. I need to be able to do this two ways - using each and seperately by using do.

What I have attempted (inspired by a previous SO question):

def eacharray(an_array)
  an_array.each do |inner|
      puts inner.join(" ")
  end
end

eacharray(fm)

However the output from the above is as follows:

1 #<FamilyMember:0x000000027e7d48>
2 #<FamilyMember:0x000000027e7c58>
3 #<FamilyMember:0x000000027e7b68>
4 #<FamilyMember:0x000000027e7a78>
5 #<FamilyMember:0x000000027e7988>

How do I output the 2D array elements nicely formatted using each and do?. Any help appreciated. Thanks.

Ideally, my output would be like this:

Family Member   Name     Sex     Type    Role    Age
1               Andrew   Male    Child   Son     27
2               Bill     Male    Parent  Father  63
3               Samantha Female  Parent  Mother  62 
4               Thomas   Male    Child   Dog     10
5               Samantha Female  Child   Dog     4 
share|improve this question
    
what is your expected output.. example please.. I didn't get this I want to be able to output the contents of the array to the console formatted as a string. –  Arup Rakshit Sep 28 '13 at 14:42
2  
Your fn is not an array, it is a hash. –  sawa Sep 28 '13 at 14:45
2  
How is this a 2D array? A family member is not an array. –  Linuxios Sep 28 '13 at 14:56
2  
@Jenny: the family members are objects. I suggest you do some reading on Object Oriented Programming principles. –  Linuxios Sep 28 '13 at 15:00
1  
@Jenny: You initialise fm to a hash with {} and assign to five different elements of it. For an array you want fm = [], and then you should probably push onto it using fm << FamilyMember.new(...). –  Borodin Sep 28 '13 at 15:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're happy with a fixed format (you could build the format dynamically depending on the maximum data width in each field) you could write something like this.

class FamilyMember
  attr_accessor :name, :sex, :type, :role, :age
  def initialize (*args)
    @name, @sex, @type, @role, @age = args
  end
end

fm = []
fm << FamilyMember.new( 'Andrew',   'Male',   'Child',  'Son' ,    '27' )
fm << FamilyMember.new( 'Bill',     'Male',   'Parent', 'Father',  '63' )
fm << FamilyMember.new( 'Samantha', 'Female', 'Parent', 'Mother',  '62' )
fm << FamilyMember.new( 'Thomas',    'Male',  'Child',  'Dog' ,    '10' )
fm << FamilyMember.new( 'Samantha', 'Female', 'Child',  'Dog' ,     '4' )

format = '%-15s %-8s %-7s %-7s %-7s %s'
puts format % ['Family Member', 'Name', 'Sex', 'Type', 'Role', 'Age']
fm.each_with_index do |member, i|
  puts format % [ i+1, member.name, member.sex, member.type, member.role, member.age ]
end

output

Family Member   Name     Sex     Type    Role    Age
1               Andrew   Male    Child   Son     27
2               Bill     Male    Parent  Father  63
3               Samantha Female  Parent  Mother  62
4               Thomas   Male    Child   Dog     10
5               Samantha Female  Child   Dog     4

You can also use for ... in, which actually compiles to pretty much the same loop, using the each iterator.

i = 0
for member in fm do
  i += 1
  puts format % [ i, member.name, member.sex, member.type, member.role, member.age ]
end

or you can use the primitive while or until loop constructs, which most Ruby programmers forget about. Ruby is much more expressive using its iterators.

i = 0
while member = fm[i] do
  i += 1
  puts format % [ i, member.name, member.sex, member.type, member.role, member.age ]
end

Note that you can omit the do from both of these last examples. As long as you have a newline (or a semicolon) after the while expression Ruby will understand just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Borodin; this works great. Is there a way to do it without using a do in the array search? I am attempting to do this too (requirement for university assignment) By saying %-15s etc you are specifying the width of the column? –  Tom Sep 28 '13 at 16:05
1  
@Jenny: I'm not sure what you mean Jenny. do ... end are brackets that enclose the list of statements to do for each array element. You could use braces instead: { ... } is similar. The % operator on a string uses the left-hand operand as a format for Kernel#sprintf, and a format specifier like %-15s means a left-justified (-) fifteen-character (15) string field (s). –  Borodin Sep 28 '13 at 20:11
1  
@Jenny: Ah, if this is for an assignment then I think I understand. I've added to my answer to explain. (Are you supposed to be asking Stack Overflow for answers?) –  Borodin Sep 28 '13 at 20:11
    
Thanks @Borodin..I will examine your additions tomorrow. .as for assignment stuff -as long as I understand the stuff I don't see the problem(the original code is all mine anyway). We have to fully explain our answer's anyway. .like a "ruby for dummies" book might do. –  Tom Sep 28 '13 at 21:05

A class like your FamilyMember is most easily constructed with a Struct. The result is just a class, but with some extra features.

FamilyMember = Struct.new(:name, :sex, :type, :status, :age)
fm = []
fm << FamilyMember.new('Andrew','Male', 'Child', 'Son' , '27' )
fm << FamilyMember.new('Bill','Male', 'Parent', 'Father' , '63' )

puts FamilyMember.members.map(&:capitalize).join("\t") #members gives you the names of all methods
fm.each{|fam_member|puts fam_member.values.join("\t")} #another feature.

Output:

 Name   Sex Type    Status  Age
 Andrew Male    Child   Son 27
 Bill   Male    Parent  Father  63

Only lined out...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.