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I'm working on problem 22 of Project Euler:

Using names.txt (right click and 'Save Link/Target As...'), a 46K text file containing over five-thousand first names, begin by sorting it into alphabetical order. Then working out the alphabetical value for each name, multiply this value by its alphabetical position in the list to obtain a name score.

For example, when the list is sorted into alphabetical order, COLIN, which is worth 3 + 15 + 12 + 9 + 14 = 53, is the 938th name in the list. So, COLIN would obtain a score of 938 × 53 = 49714.

What is the total of all the name scores in the file?

My code (below) gets the answer 871179673. The correct answer should be 871198282, which makes me off by about 18k.

def score(name, pos):
    score = 0

    for letter in name:
        if letter == "A": score += 1
        elif letter == "B": score += 2
        elif letter == "C": score += 3
        elif letter == "D": score += 4
        elif letter == "E": score += 5
        elif letter == "F": score += 6
        elif letter == "G": score += 7
        elif letter == "H": score += 8
        elif letter == "I": score += 9
        elif letter == "J": score += 10
        elif letter == "K": score += 11
        elif letter == "L": score += 12
        elif letter == "M": score += 13
        elif letter == "N": score += 14
        elif letter == "O": score += 15
        elif letter == "P": score += 16
        elif letter == "Q": score += 17
        elif letter == "R": score += 18
        elif letter == "S": score += 19
        elif letter == "T": score += 20
        elif letter == "U": score += 21
        elif letter == "V": score += 22
        elif letter == "W": score += 23
        elif letter == "X": score += 24
        elif letter == "Y": score += 25
        elif letter == "Z": score += 26
        else: score += 0
    # end for loop.

    return score * pos
#end def score.

f = open('names.txt')
string = f.readlines()
f.close()

names = sorted(str(string).split(","))
tscore = 0
pos = 1

for name in names:
    tscore += score(name, pos)
    pos += 1
#end for loop.

print tscore

If I run the 'Colin' example through my score function, I get the right result. I've tested a few other names from the list, and they score correctly as well. I googled the question and got various solutions, but since I'm new to python I'd like to learn what I did wrong. Thanks for your time!

share|improve this question
    
Whoa! there, that's too many if-elif's –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 28 '13 at 16:21
2  
Hint: take a look at the ord() function to turn an ASCII character into a integer number.. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 28 '13 at 16:22
    
ord(char)-64 will do the exact same thing as those ifs. –  iCodez Sep 28 '13 at 16:23
    
Is "position in file" supposed to index from 0 or from 1? And do any names have hyphens or spaces or apostrophes? –  lurker Sep 28 '13 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change this line:

names = sorted(str(string).split(","))

to:

names = sorted(string[0].split(','))

File contains just one line, so you need to access that line using string[0]. file.readlines returns a list containing all lines from the file, it's better to do something like:

names = f.read().split(',')
names.sort()

A shorter version of your program:

from string import ascii_uppercase
def score(word):
    return sum(ascii_uppercase.index(c) + 1 for c in word.strip('"'))

with open('names.txt') as f:
  names = f.read().split(',')
  names.sort()
print sum(i*score(x) for i, x in enumerate(names, 1))

Note: string is a built-in module, don't use it as a variable name

share|improve this answer
    
Whoa! That worked, awesome! Why does that make a difference? Since the file is one line, wouldn't 'string' contain just the one line? –  Brian Sep 28 '13 at 16:36
    
@Brian It does, but string is a list that contains that single line, to access that line in that list you need to do: string[0](As file.readlines returns a list) –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 28 '13 at 16:38
3  
To be specific, by calling str on the list that readlines() returned, Brian introduced [ and ] into the names MARY and ALONSO. That pushed MARY to the end of the list, because [ sorted after ". Simply print names to see that '[\'"MARY"' is at the end. –  DSM Sep 28 '13 at 16:41

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