Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am new to Go and also looked abit on the thread "throw: all goroutines are asleep", but I am still wondering why this piece of code deadlock. I believe that I put a number in namesInDir, and should be able to print it afterwards. It seems that I can not add the number to the channel - which confuses me. Anyone that can help me?

type uniprot struct
{
    namesInDir chan int
}


func main(){
u := uniprot{}
u.namesInDir = make(chan int)
u.namesInDir <- 1
//u.readFilenames(os.Args[1])
u.printName()
}   

func (u* uniprot) printName(){
    name := <-u.namesInDir
    fmt.Println(name)
}

I got some suggestion and that I could cheat by buffering the channel. Why is not this working?

u.namesInDir = make(chan int, 100)
u.namesInDir <- 1
for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
    go u.printName()
}
share|improve this question
    
What happens when you run your code? –  Emil Vikström Sep 28 '13 at 17:09
1  
See this question –  tarrsalah Sep 28 '13 at 17:11
    
thanks tarrsalah, I didnt find your post at first. I was reading it while you posted. –  hotGopher Sep 28 '13 at 17:13
    
@emil. I get a fatal error: all goroutines are asleep - deadlock! –  hotGopher Sep 28 '13 at 17:15
    
Even with a buffer, you cannot read more data than you have written. If you want to read ten integers, you need to enqueue at least ten of them, rather than one as you do currently. –  Camille Sep 28 '13 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Buffering the channel works like this.

A channel with no buffer blocks the sender until the receiver takes the value. In your original example you only have one go routine so all go routines are blocked when you send the integer. A buffer overcomes this. Alternatively run two go routines - one sending and one receiving.

package main

import "fmt"

type uniprot struct {
    namesInDir chan int
}

func (u *uniprot) printName() {
    name := <-u.namesInDir
    fmt.Println(name)
}

func main() {
    u := uniprot{}
    u.namesInDir = make(chan int, 1) // Buffer added here
    u.namesInDir <- 1
    //u.readFilenames(os.Args[1])
    u.printName()
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is correct but it is good style to use two goroutines with the channel (as remarked above). Channels' purpose is as a synchronisation and communication primitive between goroutines. So although a buffered channel can work as a store within a single goroutine, there are more appropriate ways to do that. –  Rick-777 Sep 30 '13 at 11:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.