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The dart codes as follows is extremely slow compared to java's implementation.

//test.dart
import 'dart:io';
void main(){
for(int i = 0; i < 1 << 25;i++){
   stdout.write(i); // or directly print(i);
 }
  stdout.close();
}

java version:

//Test.java
import java.io.*;
public class Test{
public static void main(String[]args)throws Exception {
    try{
        PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(System.out);
        for(int i = 0;i < 1 << 25; i++){
            out.print(i);
        }
        out.close();
    }catch(Exception e){}
  }
}

$ time java Test > /dev/null

real    0m6.421s
user    0m0.046s
sys     0m0.031s

$ time dart Test.dart > /dev/null

real    0m51.978s
user    0m0.015s
sys     0m0.078s

Is stdout/print() unbuffered by default in Dart? Is there something like java's PrintWriter? thanks. (Update: after warming up vm, stdout is 2x slower than java )

real 0m15.497s   
user 0m0.046s   
sys 0m0.047s

===============================================================================

Update Sep 30, 2013

I have implemented custom buffers for both dart and java codes to make a further comparing,now the result is as follows:

//test.dart
final int SIZE = 8192;
final int NUM = 1 << 25;
void main(){
  List<int> content = new List(SIZE);
  content.fillRange(0, SIZE, 0);
  for(int i = 0; i < NUM;i++){
    if(i % SIZE == 0 && i > 0)
        print(content);
    content[i % SIZE] = i;
  }
  if (NUM % SIZE ==0)
    print(content);
  else
    print(content.sublist(0, NUM % SIZE));
}

java version:

//Test.java
import java.util.Arrays;
public class Test{
public static final int SIZE = 8192;
public static final int NUM = 1 << 25;
public static void main(String[]args)throws Exception {
    try{
        int[] buf = new int[SIZE];
        for(int i = 0;i < NUM; i++){
            if(i % SIZE == 0 && i > 0)
                System.out.print(Arrays.toString(buf));
            buf[i % SIZE] = i;              
        }
        if(NUM % SIZE == 0)
            System.out.print(Arrays.toString(buf));
        else
        {
            int[] newbuf = new int[NUM % SIZE];
            newbuf = Arrays.copyOfRange(buf, 0, (NUM % SIZE));
            System.out.print(Arrays.toString(newbuf));
        }
        }catch(Exception e){}
    }
}

$ time java Test > /dev/null

real    0m7.397s
user    0m0.031s
sys     0m0.031s

$ time dart test.dart > /dev/null

real    0m22.406s
user    0m0.015s
sys     0m0.062s

As you see, dart is still 3x slower than java.

share|improve this question
    
An answer to a similar question seems to get a bit faster speeds: 2x slower vs. 3x slower. Perhaps it might help you optimize a bit further. –  Pixel Elephant Sep 30 '13 at 14:59
    
@PixelElephant: Thanks for your reply.I have read the answer and tried to directly write output into a file instead of printing on console but it is still 3x slower than java. Maybe the internal dart VM or something else need be more optimized. –  Lee LG Sep 30 '13 at 17:18
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1 Answer

Maybe your code does not get optimized by the VM. Only "frequenly" used functions are compiled and executed as native code. Usually for such benchmark, you have to put the tested code into a function and perform a warmup. For exemple:

//test.dart
import 'dart:io';
void f(nb_shift) {
for(int i = 0; i < 1 << nb_shift;i++){
   stdout.write(i); // or directly print(i);
 }
}

void main(){
  //warm up:
  f(3);
  // the test
  f(25);
  stdout.close();
}

Nicolas

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, really helpful.After warming up,now stdout is 2x slower than java. –  Lee LG Oct 1 '13 at 2:37
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