Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
(define (even x)  (= (modulo x 2) 0))
(define (twice x) (* x 2))
(define (half x)  (/ x 2))  

(define (rfmult a b)
    (cond ((= 0 a) 0)
          ((= 0 b) 0)
          ((even a) (twice (rfmult (half a) b)))
          (else     (+ b (twice (rfmult (half (- a 1)) b))))))

I've come to the understanding that (rfmult 3 4) is called, the else statement is triggered and after that (- 3 1) takes place of a and is cut in half so then it becomes (rfmult 1 4). At this point, I get lost because if it was multiplied by 2, it would never end. I just can't seem to make sense of it in my head.

share|improve this question
    
It's an algorithm based on the distributive property of multiplication. For two numbers a and b, where c is 1/2 a (2c = a) then a*b is equal to 2c*b but also 2*(c*b). And also that for any a*b where d is one less than a (d = a - 1) then a*b = a + (d * b). Note the function as written only works for integers. Just run this through a substituion model. (rfmult 3 4) turns into (+ 4 (twice (rfmult (half (- 3 1)) 4)) simply to (+ 4 (* (rfmult 1 4) 2)) and then (+ 4 (* ( + 4 (rfmult (half (- 1 1) 4)) 2)) to (+ 4 (* ( + 4 (rfmult 0 4)) 2)) to (+ 4 (* ( + 4 0)) 2)) t0 (+ 4 (* 4 2)) to (+ 8 4) to 12 –  WorBlux Sep 30 '13 at 23:47
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The recursion ends at the 'base cases' (where there is no recursive call). Your bases cases are a or b is 0.

Use 'trace-define'

|(rfmult 3 4)
| (rfmult 1 4)
| |(rfmult 0 4)       ;; ends here
| |0
| 4
|12

like this:

(trace-define (rfmult a b)    ; <= here
    (cond ((= 0 a) 0)
          ((= 0 b) 0)
          ((even a) (twice (rfmult (half a) b)))
          (else     (+ b (twice (rfmult (half (- a 1))b))))))
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think I figured it out...... so lets call (rfmult 100 5)

  1. This would then call (rfmult (100/2 5)
  2. (50/2 5)*2
  3. ((25-1)/2 5) *2
  4. (12/2 5) * 2 + b
  5. (6 5)*2
  6. (3 5)*2
  7. ((3-1)/2 5) *2
  8. (1 5)*2 + b
  9. 0!

Then you track upwards through the recursion.

So, in the (1 5) block the b value becomes 15 because 5*2 + 5=15

Then, the (3 15) block b becomes 15 *2 = 30

Then, (6 30) b becomes 30 * 2 = 60

Then, (12 60) 60*2 + 5 = 125

(25 125) 125 * 2 => 250

which brings us back to the first call of (50 250) where 250*2 = 500 and that is the solution of 5*100...

If this is the wrong thought process please correct me! I've been sitting on this recursive structure for about 2 hours now and am excited to see it sort of make sense!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.