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So the idea is I have a Doubly linked list defined as a struct

struct Node
{
    struct Node *next;
    struct Node *prev;
    char value[5];
};

struct DoubleLinkedList
{
   int size;
   struct Node *head;
   struct Node *tail;
};

and I'm inserting into the list using the InsertionSort function. I pass the pointer to my Doubly Linked list as a parameter to that and it gets modified with the addition of a new 4 character string node to the list(lexicographically sorted Linked list). I then print the linked list with the addition of each string node.

The printing is proving to be problematic. Right now, with the code below, the output is always something like (assume the strings being inserted at every step are aaaa,bbbb,cccc...)

aaaa

bbbb -> bbbb

cccc -> cccc -> cccc

For some reason the linked list structure is changing each and every node to the value of the new string to be inserted; I have no idea why! And also, if I try shifting the print block to the main function, it prints out gibberish.

int main()
{
    struct DoubleLinkedList strings;
    while (1)
{
    sleep(1);
    char s[5];
    GenerateRandomString(s,4);
    InsertionSort(&strings, s);
}
    return 0;
}

void InsertionSort(struct DoubleLinkedList *sorted, char *randomstring)
{
struct Node new;
strcpy(new.value,randomstring);
printf("Newvalue %s\n", new.value);
if ((*sorted).size == 0)
{
    new.next = NULL;
    new.prev = NULL;
    (*sorted).head = &(new);
    (*sorted).tail = &(new);
}
else
{
    printf("TEST %s\n", (*(*sorted).head).value);
    struct Node *current;
    current = (*sorted).head;
    printf("CURRENT %s\n", (*current).value);
    while (strcmp(randomstring,(*current).value) > 0)
    {
        current = (*current).next;
        if (current = NULL)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    new.next = current;
    if (current != NULL)
    {
        new.prev = (*current).prev;
        if ((*current).prev != NULL)
        {
            (*(*current).prev).next = &(new);
        }
        else
        {
            (*sorted).head = &(new);
        }
        (*current).prev = &(new);
    }
    else
    {
        new.prev = (*sorted).tail;
        (*((*sorted).tail)).next = &(new);
        (*sorted).tail = &(new);
    }
}
(*sorted).size++;
struct Node *printing;
printing = (*sorted).head;
int i;
for (i = 0; i < (*sorted).size - 1; i++)
{
    printf("%s -> ", (*printing).value);
    printing = (*printing).next;
}
printf("%s\n",(*printing).value);
}
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Why don't you write sorted->size instead of (*sorted).size? I mean, it is more common. And don't name a variable new. –  pzaenger Sep 28 '13 at 21:20
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2 Answers 2

You haven't allocated memory for the value in strcpy(new.value,randomstring); you're lucky your subsequent printf works.

You can do for example

new.value = strdup(randomstring);

(don't forget to release memory with free(new.value) when you delete your Node if you do so, because strdup calls malloc).

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Really sorry, I actually made a small edit to my program before posting the question; I am allocating memory as part of the struct now using <char value[5];> –  krandiash Sep 28 '13 at 21:29
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Er, you're not allocating memory for new either, so when you exit InsertionSort, the Node is dangling.

Should be in InsertionSort

new = (struct Node *)malloc(sizeof(struct Node));

then adjusting everything to use a pointer (that is new -> stuff instead of new.stuff and new instead of &new).

Also in main strings.size in uninitialized

strings.size = 0;

seems missing.

Last one, when you write

if (current = NULL)

I think you mean

if (current == NULL)

(in some C tradition, you'd write if (!current))

With these modifications, it seems to work.

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