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In Java, I am trying to write a subclass for the abstract Reader class. I am trying to implement Reader's close() method. The subclass I intend to write, Reader2, will translate the input from the original Reader (obtained by calling ReaderObj.read()) into something else, so that calling read() on a Reader2 object will output the translated character.

For example, this would translated all lowercase 'a', 'b', and 'c' characters into their corresponding capitals, and leave the rest unchanged:

Reader in = new InputStreamReader (System.in);
Reader2 translated = new Reader2(in, "abc", "ABC");
while (true) {
    int x = translated.read;
    if (x == -1) {
        break;
    }
    System.out.print((char x));
}

I have already implemented read(), but I don't know how to implement close().

According to the documentation, the close() method is supposed to close the stream and throw an IOException. But I don't know how to close a stream, or throw an IOException. How exactly would I rewrite close()?

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What are you actually trying to accomplish? And, you don't have to throw, you are just permitted to if necessary. –  bmargulies Sep 28 '13 at 23:11
2  
What are you writing a reader for? How to "close the stream" will depend 100% on this. –  Dukeling Sep 28 '13 at 23:12
    
I am trying to implement Reader's close() method. The subclass I intend to write, Reader2, will translate the input from the original Reader (obtained by calling ReaderObj.read()) into something else. –  George Newton Sep 28 '13 at 23:12
3  
If you dont even know how to throw an exception, you probably shouldnt be writing a reader subclass. I think your best bet is to do a lot of studying in java first. –  David Grinberg Sep 28 '13 at 23:14
    
What is your reader for? –  bmargulies Sep 28 '13 at 23:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
Reader in = new InputStreamReader (System.in);
Reader2 translated = new Reader2(in, "abc", "ABC");

You create an input stream reader and pass it into your translated reader. To close your Reader2 instance you only have to invoke the close() method on the in Reader you passed to your Reader2 instance by the constructor new Reader2(in, "abc", "ABC");.

public void close() { in.close(); }
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2  
How exactly does the original reader get closed? I looked at the documentation, and Reader's close is abstract - it has no implementation. I looked at the superclass of Reader - the interface Closeable - and it too has no implementation for close. –  George Newton Sep 28 '13 at 23:35
3  
@毛泽东: it doesn't matter how the original reader gets closed; just let class InputStreamReader do that on its own. You don't have to worry about it because your Reader2 is not a subclass of Reader. That's because having an instance of Reader in your class, does not mean that your class suddenly becomes a Reader itself. Otherwise, the fact your house has a TV in would mean that your house is a TV as well :) –  musical_coder Sep 28 '13 at 23:42

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