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Say there is an entity "Awards Ceremony." During an awards ceremony, a "Person" could get one "Award" (or another way of saying it: an award can be given to a person). This is simple enough to model.

However, it is also possible for a "Person" to be given multiple "Awards". Or an "Award" could be shared among multiple "Persons". This is where I am struggling with the modeling. I feel that I need at least 3 tables: Award Ceremony, Person, Award. Then I think I need a mapping table to correctly model how the Person entity might have multiple Award, or the Award might have multiple Person.

Any suggestions on how to model this?

I'm using MySQL. Also using Laravel's Eloquent ORM.

EDIT 1:

I think this is how it can be modeled:

award_ceremony
 - id
 - name

person
- id
- name

award
- id
- name

mapping
- id
- award_ceremony_id
- person_id
- award_id

It's the mapping table I'm not sure of.

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Can same award be granted to same person multiple times (presumably on different ceremonies)? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 8 '13 at 20:57
    
The id in the mapping table is not required. This table's PK is award_ceremony_id, person_id and award_id. This combination is always unique. Eg. 2013 Nobel Prize, Physics, Peter Higgs and 2013 Nobel Prize, Physics, Francios Englert. Introducing and extra key field is not necessary. –  Tim Child Oct 10 '13 at 1:36

3 Answers 3

You're on the right track. All you need is an intersection table (many-to-many) table between the Award and the Person like so:

enter image description here

The Recipient table allows multiple people to share an award. It also allows a person to win multiple awards. Of course, it also allows awards to be won by just one person.

Note that Recipient doesn't need its own id, the primary key of Recipient would be the combination of the foreign keys to Award and Person. Also, there is no reason to have a foreign key to Award_Ceremony since the relationship to Award already implies this relationship.

Edit: Tables & Columns...

You could use table/column definitions like so:

award_ceremony
 - id (PK)
 - name

person
- id (PK)
- name

award
- id (PK)
- name
- award_ceremony_id (FK)  // This belongs here!

recipient
- person_id (PK, FK)
- award_id (PK, FK)
share|improve this answer
    
Does my model fail, though? Is it not normalized? –  StackOverflowNewbie Sep 29 '13 at 13:06
    
@StackOverflowNewbie - The potential issue with your model is that it has insert and delete anomalies. Essentially, it has failed the test for fourth normal form. Think of it this way: what does your model do to prevent someone recording that George RR Martin won best new rap album at the Oscars? Also, how does your model represent that the Emmys has an award "outstanding variety series" prior to any winner(s) being announced? The fact that a particular award goes with a particular ceremony is semantically independent of who wins the award. –  Joel Brown Sep 29 '13 at 15:44
    
Would your model work equally well if award_ceremony_id (FK) was put in the person table? –  StackOverflowNewbie Sep 29 '13 at 21:34
1  
Putting award_ceremony_id (FK) in the person table would require multiple entries per person in the person table it they attended more than one ceremony. If you want to represent attendance a better solution would be to have an intermediate table there as well. –  kzarns Oct 9 '13 at 13:44
    
The design of StackOverflowNewbie shows that an award could be assingned to a persion multiple times in a Ceremonys (Award entity is independent of Ceremony). The design of @JoelBrown shows that an award could be assingned to a persion in a Ceremony just once. –  Mohsen Heydari Oct 12 '13 at 13:26

a person can have 1 or many award

person have award(s) || 1 to many relationship

person
- id (PK)
-award_id(PK,FK)
- name

award
- id (PK)
- name

//award ceremony can have many person

award_ceremony
-id (PK)
-person_id(FK)
-name
share|improve this answer

I have added solution where you will have schema not fully normalized. I like one of the idea adding recipient entity as well but with modification. check both of this below.

Solution:1

    Ceremony
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)

    Person
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)

    Award
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)


    AwardOwner
        -AwardOwnerID
        -AwardID        =fk TO Award.ID
        -OwnerID        =fk TO Person.ID
        -CeremonyID     =fk TO Ceremony.ID
    PK = (AwardOwnerID)
    Unique = (AwardID+OwnerID+CeremonyID)

Solution:2

    Ceremony
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)

    Person
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)

    Award
        -ID
        -NAME
    PK = (ID)
    Unique= (Name)

    AwardCeremony
        -AwardCeremonyID
        -AwardID    =fk TO Award.ID
        -CeremonyID =fk TO Ceremony.ID
        PK = (AwardCeremonyID)
        Unique = (AwardID+CeremonyID)


    AwardCeremonyRecipient 
        -AwardCeremonyID    =fk TO AwardCeremony.AwardCeremonyID
        -Recipient ID       =fk TO Person.ID
        PK = (AwardCeremonyID+Recipient ID)
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