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I need to run some code only if I'm running from within the TeamCity test launcher. What's the easiest way to detect this?

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Why you need that? –  Vasiliy Borovyak Dec 15 '09 at 13:54
    
I knew someone would ask :) TeamCity does not capture console output from FixtureSetup (youtrack.jetbrains.net/issue/TW-10588). So, I'm writing a workaround that will capture log messages from FixtureSetup and rewrite them on Setup. This workaround is only relevant when running inside the TeamCity runner. –  ripper234 Dec 15 '09 at 13:57
    
Who starts FixtureSetup? (a VS project, TeamCity command line) My idea is to try to forward the output to a file (or additional executable). –  Vasiliy Borovyak Dec 15 '09 at 14:17
    
NUnit plugin that comes with TeamCity. –  ripper234 Dec 15 '09 at 14:30
    
Oh... Life sucks sometimes. You can select "Command line" Runner, run unit tests there, and pipe the output to some file. nunit.exe -runomsethins somelibrary.dll > nunitoutput.txt –  Vasiliy Borovyak Dec 15 '09 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Check if TEAMCITY_VERSION environment variable is defined.

Another approach is to use NUnit categories.

Based on the comment below this code should be able to check if the test is being run by teamcity:

private static bool IsOnTeamCity() 
{ 
    string environmentVariableValue = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("TEAMCITY_VERSION"); 
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(environmentVariableValue)) 
    { 
         return true; 
    } 
    return false; 
} 
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this is working code based on Eugene's idea: private static bool IsOnTeamCity() { string environmentVariableValue = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("TEAMCITY_VERSION"); if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(environmentVariableValue)) { return true; } return false; } –  Maxim Eliseev Apr 4 '14 at 13:50

I'm basically doing that with the following property. It get's the directory name via code base of the calling assembly and if it contains parts of your TeamCity build agent directory it is running within TeamCity.

public static bool IsTeamCity
{
    get
    {
        // the Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location property gives funny results when using 
        // NUnit (where assemblies run from a temporary folder), so the use of CodeBase is preferred.
        string codeBase = Assembly.GetCallingAssembly().CodeBase;
        string assemblyFullPath = Uri.UnescapeDataString(new UriBuilder(codeBase).Path);
        string assemblyDirectory = Path.GetDirectoryName(assemblyFullPath);

        // a full TeamCity build directory would be e.g. 'D:\TeamCity\buildAgent\work\de796548775cea8e\build\Compile'
        return assemblyDirectory.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("buildagent\\work");
    }
}
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