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I'm trying to compare different methods for matrix multiplication. The first one is normal method:

do
{
    for (j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (k = 0; k < i; k++)
        {
            suma = 0;
            for (l = 0; l < i; l++)
                suma += MatrixA[j][l]*MatrixB[l][k];
                MatrixR[j][k] = suma;
            }
        }
    }
    c++;
} while (c<iteraciones);

The second one consist of transposing the matrix B first and then do the multiplication by rows:

int f, co;
for (f = 0; f < i; f++) {
    for ( co = 0; co < i; co++) {
        MatrixB[f][co] = MatrixB[co][f];
    }
}

c = 0;
do
{
    for (j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (k = 0; k < i; k++)
        {
            suma = 0;
            for (l = 0; l < i; l++)
                suma += MatrixA[j][l]*MatrixB[k][l];
                MatrixR[j][k] = suma;
            }
        }
     }
     c++;
} while (c<iteraciones);

The second method supposed to be much faster, because we are accessing contiguous memory slots, but I'm not getting a significant improvement in the performance. Am I doing something wrong?

I can post the complete code, but I think is not needed.

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2  
Unless you are implementing your own matrix multiplication routines as a learning exercise you should seriously consider using an existing, vetted, optimized library such as BLAS or LAPACK. –  maerics Feb 21 '13 at 16:33
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12 Answers

What Every Programmer Should Know About Memory (pdf link) by Ulrich Drepper has a lot of good ideas about memory efficiency, but in particular, he uses matrix multiplication as an example of how knowing about memory and using that knowledge can speed this process. Look at appendix A.1 in his paper, and read through section 6.2.1. Table 6.2 in the paper shows that he could get his running time to be 10% from a naive implementation's time for a 1000x1000 matrix.

Granted, his final code is pretty hairy and uses a lot of system-specific stuff and compile-time tuning, but still, if you really need speed, reading that paper and reading his implementation is definitely worth it.

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If you really need speed, just use a correct BLAS implementation and don't roll up your linear algebra routines yourself. –  Alexandre C. Jun 3 '12 at 22:19
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Getting this right can be non-trivial. One optmiziation that is of particular importance for large matrices, is tiling the multiplication to keep stuff in the cache. I once measured a 12x performance difference doing so, but I specifically picked a matrix size that consumed multiples of my cache (circa '97 so the cache was small).

There's a lot of literature on the subject. A starting point is:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_tiling

For a more in depth study, the following references, especially the Banerjee books, may be helpful:

[Ban93] Banerjee, Utpal, Loop Transformations for Restructuring Compilers: the Foundations, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Norwell, MA, 1993.

[Ban94] Banerjee, Utpal, Loop Parallelization, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Norwell, MA, 1994.

[BGS93] Bacon, David F., Susan L. Graham, and Oliver Sharp, Compiler Transformations for High-Performance Computing, Computer Science Division, University of California, Berkeley, Calif., Technical Report No UCB/CSD-93-781.

[LRW91] Lam, Monica S., Edward E. Rothberg, and Michael E Wolf. The Cache Performance and Optimizations of Blocked Algorithms, In 4th International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages, held in Santa Clara, Calif., April, 1991, 63-74.

[LW91] Lam, Monica S., and Michael E Wolf. A Loop Transformation Theory and an Algorithm to Maximize Parallelism, In IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, 1991, 2(4):452-471.

[PW86] Padua, David A., and Michael J. Wolfe, Advanced Compiler Optimizations for Supercomputers, In Communications of the ACM, 29(12):1184-1201, 1986.

[Wolfe89] Wolfe, Michael J. Optimizing Supercompilers for Supercomputers, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1989.

[Wolfe96] Wolfe, Michael J., High Performance Compilers for Parallel Computing, Addison-Wesley, CA, 1996.

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If the matrix is not large enough or you don't repeat the operations a high number of times you won't see appreciable differences.

If the matrix is, say, 1,000x1,000 you will begin to see improvements, but I would say that if it is below 100x100 you should not worry about it.

Also, any 'improvement' may be of the order of milliseconds, unless yoy are either working with extremely large matrices or repeating the operation thousands of times.

Finally, if you change the computer you are using for a faster one the differences will be even narrower!

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Yes I'm trying with 800X800 matrix, but the result between them is in the best case 1.4 times faster, not very significant. I think it depends on the cache memory. –  Peter Dec 15 '09 at 13:55
    
800 x 800 is small, try something in the range 8000 x 8000 as well –  High Performance Mark Dec 15 '09 at 13:58
1  
@Peter I think you are correct –  Andreas Brinck Dec 15 '09 at 14:03
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ATTENTION: You have a BUG in your second implementation

for (f = 0; f < i; f++) {
    for (co = 0; co < i; co++) {
        MatrixB[f][co] = MatrixB[co][f];
    }
}

When you do f=0, c=1

        MatrixB[0][1] = MatrixB[1][0];

you overwrite MatrixB[0][1] and lose that value! When the loop gets to f=1, c=0

        MatrixB[1][0] = MatrixB[0][1];

the value copied is the same that was already there.

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Oh! I see, should I use a tmp matrix? That will increase the time even more than the first method –  Peter Dec 15 '09 at 14:41
    
You can transpose the matrix with one temporary variable: for (f=0; f<i-1; f++) for (co=f+1; co<i; co++) swap(MatrixB[f]+co, MatrixB[co]+f); –  pmg Dec 16 '09 at 8:58
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Here look at this article which shows you how to tune matrix multiplication but also points you to 2 different libraries which are even better tuned.

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Just something for you to try (but this would only make a difference for large matrices): seperate out your addition logic from the multiplication logic in the inner loop like so:

for (k = 0; k < i; k++)
{
    int sums[i];//I know this size declaration is illegal in C. consider 
            //this pseudo-code.
    for (l = 0; l < i; l++)
        sums[l] = MatrixA[j][l]*MatrixB[k][l];

    int suma = 0;
    for(int s = 0; s < i; s++)
       suma += sums[s];
}

This is because you end up stalling your pipeline when you write to suma. Granted, much of this is taken care of in register renaming and the like, but with my limited understanding of hardware, if I wanted to squeeze every ounce of performance out of the code, I would do this because now you don't have to stall the pipeline to wait for a write to suma. Since multiplication is more expensive than addition, you want to let the machine paralleliz it as much as possible, so saving your stalls for the addition means you spend less time waiting in the addition loop than you would in the multiplication loop.

This is just my logic. Others with more knowledge in the area may disagree.

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Comment 1: If your concerned about the instruction pipeline, consider unrolling the loops. Reducing the number of branches will speed up execution far more then separating multiplication from addition (some processors have single instructions that multiply and add). –  Thomas Matthews Dec 15 '09 at 19:33
    
Comment 2: Move the sums array and the suma variables outside the scope of the for loop. Also consider moving the index variables l and s too. When they are inside the outer for loop they will created and destroyed for every iteration of the outer for loop. Removing unnecessary instructions will also speed up execution. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 15 '09 at 19:36
    
i was actually assuming the compiler would unroll the loops because that's pretty common, but i think it's rather unlikely that it will cache the multiplications separately for you, as it's difficult to determine the semantics of a reduction. Maybe i'm worng and every compiler does it. for your second comment, you are incorrect. the semantics in the code show that the memory is coming off of the stack, which means it is set aside at the beginning of the function, one time. –  San Jacinto Dec 15 '09 at 19:51
    
Also, in regard to your first comment, I think you are missing the point. It's not atomicity of the mult we are concerned about, it's the time it takes to execute a mult. Modern processors can still take tens of times longer to do a mult than an add. So, if you stall the pipeline until you have a value to put into suma, you very well may be waiting 40 cycles+ longer each iteration of the loop than you need to, as opposed to only stalling once or twice (if you unroll the loop, or the compiler does). –  San Jacinto Dec 16 '09 at 0:31
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How big improvements you get will depend on:

  1. The size of the cache
  2. The size of a cache line
  3. The degree of associativity of the cache

For small matrix sizes and modern processors it's highly probable that the data fron both MatrixA and MatrixB will be kept nearly entirely in the cache after you touch it the first time.

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Can you post some data comparing your 2 approaches for a range of matrix sizes ? It may be that your expectations are unrealistic and that your 2nd version is faster but you haven't done the measurements yet.

Don't forget, when measuring execution time, to include the time to transpose matrixB.

Something else you might want to try is comparing the performance of your code with that of the equivalent operation from your BLAS library. This may not answer your question directly, but it will give you a better idea of what you might expect from your code.

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You should not write matrix multiplication. You should depend on external libraries. In particular you should use the GEMM routine from the BLAS library. GEMM often provides the following optimizations

Blocking

Efficient Matrix Multiplication relies on blocking your matrix and performing several smaller blocked multiplies. Ideally the size of each block is chosen to fit nicely into cache greatly improving performance.

Tuning

The ideal block size depends on the underlying memory hierarchy (how big is the cache?). As a result libraries should be tuned and compiled for each specific machine. This is done, among others, by the ATLAS implementation of BLAS.

Assembly Level Optimization

Matrix multiplicaiton is so common that developers will optimize it by hand. In particular this is done in GotoBLAS.

Heterogeneous(GPU) Computing

Matrix Multiply is very FLOP/compute intensive, making it an ideal candidate to be run on GPUs. cuBLAS and MAGMA are good candidates for this.

In short, dense linear algebra is a well studied topic. People devote their lives to the improvement of these algorithms. You should use their work; it will make them happy.

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not so special but better :

    c = 0;
do
{
    for (j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (k = 0; k < i; k++)
        {
            sum = 0; sum_ = 0;
            for (l = 0; l < i; l++) {
                MatrixB[j][k] = MatrixB[k][j];
                sum += MatrixA[j][l]*MatrixB[k][l];
                l++;
                MatrixB[j][k] = MatrixB[k][j];
                sum_ += MatrixA[j][l]*MatrixB[k][l];

                sum += sum_;
            }
            MatrixR[j][k] = sum;
        }
     }
     c++;
} while (c<iteraciones);
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If you are working on small numbers, then the improvement you are mentioning is negligible. Also, performance will vary depend on the Hardware on which you are running. But if you are working on numbers in millions, then it will effect. Coming to the program, can you paste the program you have written.

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What I'm doing is starting from a 1x1 matrix until 1000X1000, the bigest one is multiplied 1 time, and the smaller one a number proportional to the maximum (MxMxM / NxNxN, being M the bigest one). So i.e a 1x1 matrix will be multiplied 1250000 times, 2x2 578703 and so on. Then I divided the total time for the total iterations for that dimension –  Peter Dec 15 '09 at 14:13
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The computation complexity of multiplication of two N*N matrix is O(N^3). The performance will be dramatically improved if you use O(N^2.73) algorithm which probably has been adopted by MATLAB. If you installed a MATLAB, try to multiply two 1024*1024 matrix. On my computer, MATLAB complete it in 0.7s, but the C\C++ implementation of the naive algorithm like yours takes 20s. If you really care about the performance, refer to lower-complex algorithms. I heard there exists O(N^2.4) algorithm, however it needs a very large matrix so that other manipulations can be neglected.

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