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I was wondering how I can left join a table to itself or use a case statement to assign max values within a view. Say I have the following table:

 Lastname     Firstname     Filename
 Smith        John          001
 Smith        John          002
 Smith        Anna          003
 Smith        Anna          004

I want to create a view that lists all the values but also has another column that displays whether the current row is the max row, such as:

 Lastname     Firstname     Filename     Max_Filename
 Smith        John          001          NULL
 Smith        John          002          002
 Smith        Anna          003          NULL
 Smith        Anna          004          NULL

Is this possible? I have tried the following query:

 SELECT Lastname, Firstname, Filename, CASE WHEN Filename = MAX(FileName) 
 THEN Filename ELSE NULL END AS Max_Filename

but I am told that Lastname is not in the group by clause. However, if I group on Lastname, firstname, filename, then everything in the max_filename is the same as filename.

Can you please help me understand what I'm doing wrong and how to make this query work?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

actually you're very close, but instead of using max as simple aggregate you can use max as window function:

select
    Lastname, Firstname, Filename,
    case
        when Filename = max(Filename) over(partition by Lastname, Firstname) then Filename
        else null
    end as Max_Filename
from Table1

sql fiddle demo

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1  
Second time you beat me with more elegant solution. Won't be last time, I'm sure. I've got a question though: your query has more complicated execution plan and runs slower (though that may depend on data, indexes - I didn't do much testing). Is that expected? –  Szymon Sep 29 '13 at 10:10
1  
How can you say either of those @Szymon? Both queries will have to full-scan the table unless everything is in an index; your query will have to do a second scan on firstname, lastname (assuming it's indexed) and so should probably have the more complicated execution plan and run much slower. –  Ben Sep 29 '13 at 10:15
1  
well, haven't checked for execution plan, but actually I'm sure two scans (or seeks) in your query should be slower than one in mine. Do you have sqlfiddle with examples? –  Roman Pekar Sep 29 '13 at 10:15
    
All good, false alarm. The right index made your query better: index lastname, surname, include filename. Sorry for confusion. –  Szymon Sep 29 '13 at 10:18
    
Thanks, this is exactly what I needed! –  user1422348 Sep 29 '13 at 14:19

It could be something like that:

SELECT 
    T.Lastname, 
    T.FirstName, 
    T.Filename,
    CASE (SELECT MAX(T1.Filename) FROM MyTable T1 
            WHERE T.Lastname = T1.Lastname AND T.FirstName = T1.FirstName)
        WHEN T.Filename THEN T.Filename
        ELSE NULL
    END
FROM MyTable T

But I'm not sure what you mean by max filename? Total max from all records? Or separately for each name? Your expected result don't match either. Let me know and I'll modify the query.

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I was referring to the max for each first/last name combination. Thank you for your answer! –  user1422348 Sep 29 '13 at 14:17

Try this.

DECLARE @TAB2 TABLE(LASTNAME VARCHAR(40), FIRSTNAME VARCHAR(40), FILENAME VARCHAR(40)) 
INSERT INTO @TAB2 VALUES 
( 'Smith',        'John',          '001'),
( 'Smith',        'John',          '002'),
( 'Smith',        'Anna',          '003'),
( 'Smith',        'Anna',          '004')

SELECT 
    LASTNAME, 
    FIRSTNAME, 
    FILENAME,
    CASE ROW_NO WHEN 2 THEN FILENAME ELSE NULL END AS  MAX_FILENAME
FROM 
(
    SELECT 
        LASTNAME, 
        FIRSTNAME, 
        FILENAME,
        ROW_NO = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY FIRSTNAME ORDER BY FILENAME ASC) 
     FROM @TAB2
 )A
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