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I'm trying to animate some drawables in Android, I've set a path using PathEvaluator that animates along some curves along a full path.

When I set a duration (e.g. 6 seconds) it splits the duration to the number of curves I've set regardless of their length which causes the animation to be to slow on some segments and too fast on others.

On iOS this can be fixed using

animation.calculationMode   = kCAAnimationCubicPaced;
animation.timingFunction    = ...;

Which lets iOS to smooth your entire path into mid-points and span the duration according to each segment length. Is there any way to get the same result in Android?

(besides breaking the path into discrete segments and assigning each segment its own duration manually which is really ugly and unmaintainable).

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3 Answers 3

I don't think that anything can be done with ObjectAnimator because there seems to be no function that can be called to assert the relative duration of a certain fragment of the animation.

I did develop something similar to what you need a while back, but it works slightly differently - it inherits from Animation.

I've modified everything to work with your curving needs, and with the PathPoint class.

Here's an overview:

  1. I supply the list of points to the animation in the constructor.

  2. I calculate the length between all the points using a simple distance calculator. I then sum it all up to get the overall length of the path, and store the segment lengths in a map for future use (this is to improve efficiency during runtime).

  3. When animating, I use the current interpolation time to figure out which 2 points I'm animating between, considering the ratio of time & the ratio of distance traveled.

  4. I calculate the time it should take to animate between these 2 points according to the relative distance between them, compared to the overall distance.

  5. I then interpolate separately between these 2 points using the calculation in the PathAnimator class.

Here's the code:

CurveAnimation.java:

public class CurveAnimation extends Animation 
{
    private static final float BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY = 0.001f; // Must be divisible by one. Make smaller to improve accuracy, but will increase runtime at start of animation.
    private List<PathPoint> mPathPoints;
    private float mOverallLength;
    private Map<PathPoint, Double> mSegmentLengths = new HashMap<PathPoint, Double>(); // map between the end point and the length of the path to it.

    public CurveAnimation(List<PathPoint> pathPoints)
    {
        mPathPoints = pathPoints;

        if (mPathPoints == null || mPathPoints.size() < 2)
        {
            Log.e("CurveAnimation", "There must be at least 2 points on the path. There will be an exception soon!");
        }

        calculateOverallLength();
    }

    @Override
    protected void applyTransformation(float interpolatedTime, Transformation t) 
    {       
        PathPoint[] startEndPart = getStartEndForTime(interpolatedTime);

        PathPoint startPoint = startEndPart[0];
        PathPoint endPoint = startEndPart[1];

        float startTime = getStartTimeOfPoint(startPoint);
        float endTime = getStartTimeOfPoint(endPoint);      
        float progress = (interpolatedTime - startTime) / (endTime - startTime);


        float x, y;
        float[] xy;
        if (endPoint.mOperation == PathPoint.CURVE) 
        {
            xy = getBezierXY(startPoint, endPoint, progress);
            x = xy[0];
            y = xy[1];
        } 
        else if (endPoint.mOperation == PathPoint.LINE) 
        {
            x = startPoint.mX + progress * (endPoint.mX - startPoint.mX);
            y = startPoint.mY + progress * (endPoint.mY - startPoint.mY);
        } 
        else 
        {
            x = endPoint.mX;
            y = endPoint.mY;
        }              

        t.getMatrix().setTranslate(x, y);
        super.applyTransformation(interpolatedTime, t);
    }


    private PathPoint[] getStartEndForTime(float time)
    {       
        double length = 0;

        if (time == 1)
        {
            return new PathPoint[] { mPathPoints.get(mPathPoints.size() - 2), mPathPoints.get(mPathPoints.size() - 1) }; 
        }

        PathPoint[] result = new PathPoint[2];

        for (int i = 0; i < mPathPoints.size() - 1; i++)
        {
            length += calculateLengthFromIndex(i);
            if (length / mOverallLength >= time)
            {
                result[0] = mPathPoints.get(i);
                result[1] = mPathPoints.get(i + 1);
                break;
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

    private float getStartTimeOfPoint(PathPoint point)
    {
        float result = 0;
        int index = 0;          

        while (mPathPoints.get(index) != point && index < mPathPoints.size() - 1)
        {
            result += (calculateLengthFromIndex(index) / mOverallLength);
            index++;
        }

        return result;

    }

    private void calculateOverallLength()
    {
        mOverallLength = 0;      
        mSegmentLengths.clear();

        double segmentLength;

        for (int i = 0; i < mPathPoints.size() - 1; i++)
        {
            segmentLength = calculateLengthFromIndex(i);
            mSegmentLengths.put(mPathPoints.get(i + 1), segmentLength);
            mOverallLength += segmentLength;
        }
    }

    private double calculateLengthFromIndex(int index)
    {
        PathPoint start = mPathPoints.get(index);
        PathPoint end = mPathPoints.get(index + 1);
        return calculateLength(start, end);
    }

    private double calculateLength(PathPoint start, PathPoint end)
    {
        if (mSegmentLengths.containsKey(end))
        {
            return mSegmentLengths.get(end);
        }       
        else if (end.mOperation == PathPoint.LINE)
        {
            return calculateLength(start.mX, end.mX, start.mY, end.mY);
        }
        else if (end.mOperation == PathPoint.CURVE)
        {
            return calculateBezeirLength(start, end);
        }
        else
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    private double calculateLength(float x0, float x1, float y0, float y1)
    {
        return Math.sqrt(((x0 - x1) * (x0 - x1)) + ((y0 - y1) * (y0 - y1)));
    }

    private double calculateBezeirLength(PathPoint start, PathPoint end)
    {
        double result = 0;  
        float x, y, x0, y0;
        float[] xy;

        x0 = start.mX;
        y0 = start.mY;              

        for (float progress = BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY; progress <= 1; progress += BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY)
        {
            xy = getBezierXY(start, end, progress);
            x = xy[0];
            y = xy[1];

            result += calculateLength(x, x0, y, y0);

            x0 = x;
            y0 = y;
        }

        return result;
    }

    private float[] getBezierXY(PathPoint start, PathPoint end, float progress)
    {
        float[] result = new float[2];

        float oneMinusT, x, y;  

        oneMinusT = 1 - progress;
        x = oneMinusT * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * start.mX +
                3 * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * progress * end.mControl0X +
                3 * oneMinusT * progress * progress * end.mControl1X +
                progress * progress * progress * end.mX;
        y = oneMinusT * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * start.mY +
                3 * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * progress * end.mControl0Y +
                3 * oneMinusT * progress * progress * end.mControl1Y +
                progress * progress * progress * end.mY;

        result[0] = x;
        result[1] = y;

        return result;
    }

}

Here's a sample that shows how to activate the animation:

private void animate()
    {
        AnimatorPath path = new AnimatorPath();
        path.moveTo(0, 0);
        path.lineTo(0, 300);
        path.curveTo(100, 0, 300, 900, 400, 500);        

        CurveAnimation animation = new CurveAnimation(path.mPoints);
        animation.setDuration(5000);
        animation.setInterpolator(new LinearInterpolator());

        btn.startAnimation(animation);
    }

Now, keep in mind that I'm currently calculating the length of the curve according to an approximation. This will obviously cause some mild inaccuracies in the speed. If you feel it's not accurate enough, feel free to modify the code. Also, if you want to increase the length accuracy of the curve, try decreasing the value of BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY. It must be dividable by 1, so accepted values can be 0.001, 0.000025, etc.

While you might notice some mild fluctuations in speed when using curves, I'm sure it's much better than simply dividing the time equally between all paths.

I hope this helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great idea, I'll look into Bezier curve length calc and try to and improve it. The logic was what I wanted but the code didn't fit well with my requirements since I'm not animating a view, but using ObjectAnimator.ofObject. I'll reward you with the bounty and add the code I wrote which is based on your answer as the accepted answer for other users to use. Thank you so much! –  marmor Oct 8 '13 at 14:06
    
cheers man! glad I could help :) –  Gil Moshayof Oct 8 '13 at 14:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried using Gil's answer, but it didn't fit how I was animating. Gil wrote an Animation class which is used to animate Views. I was using ObjectAnimator.ofObject() to animate custom classes using ValueProperties which can't be used with custom Animation.

So this is what I did:

  1. I extend PathEvaluator and override its evaluate method.
  2. I use Gil's logic to calculate path total length, and segmented lengths
  3. Since PathEvaluator.evaluate is called for each PathPoint with t values 0..1, I needed to normalize the interpolated time given to me, so it'll be incremental and won't zero out for each segment.
  4. I ignore the start/end PathPoints given to me so the current position can be before start or after end along the path depending on the segment's duration.
  5. I pass the current progress calculated to my super (PathEvaluator) to calc the actual position.

This is the code:

public class NormalizedEvaluator extends PathEvaluator {
    private static final float BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY = 0.001f;
    private List<PathPoint> mPathPoints;
    private float mOverallLength;
    private Map<PathPoint, Double> mSegmentLengths = new HashMap<PathPoint, Double>();

    public NormalizedEvaluator(List<PathPoint> pathPoints) {
        mPathPoints = pathPoints;

        if (mPathPoints == null || mPathPoints.size() < 2) {
            Log.e("CurveAnimation",
                    "There must be at least 2 points on the path. There will be an exception soon!");
        }

        calculateOverallLength();
    }

    @Override
    public PathPoint evaluate(float interpolatedTime, PathPoint ignoredStartPoint,
            PathPoint ignoredEndPoint) {

        float index = getStartIndexOfPoint(ignoredStartPoint);
        float normalizedInterpolatedTime = (interpolatedTime + index) / (mPathPoints.size() - 1);

        PathPoint[] startEndPart = getStartEndForTime(normalizedInterpolatedTime);

        PathPoint startPoint = startEndPart[0];
        PathPoint endPoint = startEndPart[1];

        float startTime = getStartTimeOfPoint(startPoint);
        float endTime = getStartTimeOfPoint(endPoint);
        float progress = (normalizedInterpolatedTime - startTime) / (endTime - startTime);

        return super.evaluate(progress, startPoint, endPoint);
    }

    private PathPoint[] getStartEndForTime(float time) {
        double length = 0;

        if (time == 1) {
            return new PathPoint[] { mPathPoints.get(mPathPoints.size() - 2),
                    mPathPoints.get(mPathPoints.size() - 1) };
        }

        PathPoint[] result = new PathPoint[2];

        for (int i = 0; i < mPathPoints.size() - 1; i++) {
            length += calculateLengthFromIndex(i);
            if (length / mOverallLength >= time) {
                result[0] = mPathPoints.get(i);
                result[1] = mPathPoints.get(i + 1);
                break;
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

    private float getStartIndexOfPoint(PathPoint point) {

        for (int ii = 0; ii < mPathPoints.size(); ii++) {
            PathPoint current = mPathPoints.get(ii);
            if (current == point) {
                return ii;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }

    private float getStartTimeOfPoint(PathPoint point) {
        float result = 0;
        int index = 0;

        while (mPathPoints.get(index) != point && index < mPathPoints.size() - 1) {
            result += (calculateLengthFromIndex(index) / mOverallLength);
            index++;
        }

        return result;

    }

    private void calculateOverallLength() {
        mOverallLength = 0;
        mSegmentLengths.clear();

        double segmentLength;

        for (int i = 0; i < mPathPoints.size() - 1; i++) {
            segmentLength = calculateLengthFromIndex(i);
            mSegmentLengths.put(mPathPoints.get(i + 1), segmentLength);
            mOverallLength += segmentLength;
        }
    }

    private double calculateLengthFromIndex(int index) {
        PathPoint start = mPathPoints.get(index);
        PathPoint end = mPathPoints.get(index + 1);
        return calculateLength(start, end);
    }

    private double calculateLength(PathPoint start, PathPoint end) {
        if (mSegmentLengths.containsKey(end)) {
            return mSegmentLengths.get(end);
        } else if (end.mOperation == PathPoint.LINE) {
            return calculateLength(start.mX, end.mX, start.mY, end.mY);
        } else if (end.mOperation == PathPoint.CURVE) {
            return calculateBezeirLength(start, end);
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    private double calculateLength(float x0, float x1, float y0, float y1) {
        return Math.sqrt(((x0 - x1) * (x0 - x1)) + ((y0 - y1) * (y0 - y1)));
    }

    private double calculateBezeirLength(PathPoint start, PathPoint end) {
        double result = 0;
        float x, y, x0, y0;
        float[] xy;

        x0 = start.mX;
        y0 = start.mY;

        for (float progress = BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY; progress <= 1; progress += BEZIER_LENGTH_ACCURACY) {
            xy = getBezierXY(start, end, progress);
            x = xy[0];
            y = xy[1];

            result += calculateLength(x, x0, y, y0);

            x0 = x;
            y0 = y;
        }

        return result;
    }

    private float[] getBezierXY(PathPoint start, PathPoint end, float progress) {
        float[] result = new float[2];

        float oneMinusT, x, y;

        oneMinusT = 1 - progress;
        x = oneMinusT * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * start.mX + 3 * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * progress
                * end.mControl0X + 3 * oneMinusT * progress * progress * end.mControl1X + progress
                * progress * progress * end.mX;
        y = oneMinusT * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * start.mY + 3 * oneMinusT * oneMinusT * progress
                * end.mControl0Y + 3 * oneMinusT * progress * progress * end.mControl1Y + progress
                * progress * progress * end.mY;

        result[0] = x;
        result[1] = y;

        return result;
    }

}

This is the usage:

NormalizedEvaluator evaluator = new NormalizedEvaluator((List<PathPoint>) path.getPoints());
ObjectAnimator anim = ObjectAnimator.ofObject(object, "position", evaluator, path.getPoints().toArray());
share|improve this answer

UPDATE: I just realized that I might have reinvented the wheel, please look at Specifying Keyframes.


It is shocking to see that nothing is available of this kind. Anyways if you don't want to calculate path length at run time then I was able to add functionality of assigning weights to paths. Idea is to assign a weight to your path and run the animation if it feels OK then well and good otherwise just decrease or increase weight assigned to each Path.

Following code is modified code from official Android sample that you pointed in your question:

 // Set up the path we're animating along
    AnimatorPath path = new AnimatorPath();
    path.moveTo(0, 0).setWeight(0);
    path.lineTo(0, 300).setWeight(30);// assign arbitrary weight
    path.curveTo(100, 0, 300, 900, 400, 500).setWeight(70);// assign arbitrary  weight

    final PathPoint[] points = path.getPoints().toArray(new PathPoint[] {});
    mFirstKeyframe = points[0];
    final int numFrames = points.length;
    final PathEvaluator pathEvaluator = new PathEvaluator();
    final ValueAnimator anim = ValueAnimator.ofInt(0, 1);// dummy values
    anim.setDuration(1000);
    anim.setInterpolator(new LinearInterpolator());
    anim.addUpdateListener(new AnimatorUpdateListener() {

        @Override
        public void onAnimationUpdate(ValueAnimator animation) {
            float fraction = animation.getAnimatedFraction();
            // Special-case optimization for the common case of only two
            // keyframes
            if (numFrames == 2) {
                PathPoint nextPoint = pathEvaluator.evaluate(fraction,
                        points[0], points[1]);
                setButtonLoc(nextPoint);
            } else {
                PathPoint prevKeyframe = mFirstKeyframe;
                for (int i = 1; i < numFrames; ++i) {
                    PathPoint nextKeyframe = points[i];
                    if (fraction < nextKeyframe.getFraction()) { 
                        final float prevFraction = prevKeyframe
                                .getFraction();
                        float intervalFraction = (fraction - prevFraction)
                                / (nextKeyframe.getFraction() - prevFraction);
                        PathPoint nextPoint = pathEvaluator.evaluate(
                                intervalFraction, prevKeyframe,
                                nextKeyframe);
                        setButtonLoc(nextPoint);
                        break;
                    }
                    prevKeyframe = nextKeyframe;
                }
            }
        }
    });

And that's it !!!.

Of course I modified other classes as well but nothing big was added. E.g. in PathPoint I added this:

float mWeight;
float mFraction;
public void setWeight(float weight) {
    mWeight = weight;
}

public float getWeight() {
    return mWeight;
}

public void setFraction(float fraction) {
    mFraction = fraction;
}

public float getFraction() {
    return mFraction;
}

In AnimatorPath I modified getPoints() method like this:

public Collection<PathPoint> getPoints() {
    // calculate fractions
    float totalWeight = 0.0F;
    for (PathPoint p : mPoints) {
        totalWeight += p.getWeight();
    }

    float lastWeight = 0F;
    for (PathPoint p : mPoints) {
        p.setFraction(lastWeight = lastWeight + p.getWeight() / totalWeight);
    } 
    return mPoints;
}

And thats pretty much it. Oh and for better readability I added Builder Pattern in AnimatorPath, so all 3 methods were changed like this:

public PathPoint moveTo(float x, float y) {// same for lineTo and curveTo method
    PathPoint p = PathPoint.moveTo(x, y);
    mPoints.add(p);
    return p;
}

NOTE: To handle Interpolators that can give fraction less then 0 or greater than 1 (e.g. AnticipateOvershootInterpolator) look at com.nineoldandroids.animation.KeyframeSet.getValue(float fraction) method and implement the logic in onAnimationUpdate(ValueAnimator animation).

share|improve this answer
    
This is an awesome idea, but I prefered Gil's answer as I want to have a generic as possible solution to add to many places across my app (without having to guess weights whenever I modify a path). But this is a quick and easy approach anyways. Thumbs up. –  marmor Oct 8 '13 at 14:03

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