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I'm implementing a linked list and it needs to have a function that when given a head of a linked list and a cstring, it finds and deletes a node whose value is the cstring.

typedef struct node
{
  char entry[21];
  struct node* next;
} node;


/*returns true if node with phrase value found, otherwise false*/
bool findAndRemove(node* root, char phrase[21])
{
    if(root != NULL)
    {
        node* previous = NULL;
        while(root->next != NULL)
        {
            if(strcmp(root->entry, phrase) == 0)//found
            {
                if(previous == NULL)//node to delete is at head
                {
                    node* tmp = root;
                    root = root->next;
                    free(tmp);
                    return true;
                }
                previous->next = root->next;
                free(root);
                return true;
            }
            previous = root;
            root = root->next;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

It works alright but when deleting the head some garbage gets printed out. What is happening and how can I fix this? Do I have any memory leaks? Out of curiosity is the term "root" or "head" more commonly used for the first node in a linked list?

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3  
I would say "head" is more appropriate for a linked list, I would use root for tree-like structures –  aves Sep 29 '13 at 10:36

3 Answers 3

The first thing to realise is that removing an element from a linked list involves changing exactly one pointer value: the pointer that points at us. This can be the external head pointer that points to the first list element, or one of the ->next pointers inside the list. In both cases that pointer needs to be changed; its new value should become the value of the ->next pointer of the node to be deleted.

In order to change some object (from within a function) we need a pointer to it. We need to change a pointer, so we will need a pointer to pointer.

bool findAndRemove1(node **ptp, char *phrase)
{
    node *del;

    for( ;*ptp; ptp = &(*ptp)->next) {
        if( !strcmp((*ptp)->entry, phrase) ) { break; } //found
        }

      /* when we get here, ptp either
      ** 1) points to the pointer that points at the node we want to delete
      ** 2) or it points to the NULL pointer at the end of the list
      **    (in the case nothing was found)
      */
    if ( !*ptp) return false; // not found

    del = *ptp;
    *ptp = (*ptp)->next;
    free(del);
    return true;
}

The number of if conditions can even be reduced to one by doing the dirty work in the loop,and returning from the loop but that would be a bit of a hack:

bool findAndRemove2(node **ptp, char *phrase)
{

    for( ;*ptp; ptp = &(*ptp)->next) {
        node *del;
        if( strcmp((*ptp)->entry, phrase) ) continue; // not the one we want

          /* when we get here, ptp MUST
          ** 1) point to the pointer that points at the node we want to delete
          */
        del = *ptp;
        *ptp = (*ptp)->next;
        free(del);
        return true;
        }
    return false; // not found
}

But what if the list is not unique, and we want to delete all the nodes that satisfy the condition? We just alter the loop logic a bit and add a counter:

unsigned searchAndDestroy(node **ptp, char *phrase)
{
    unsigned cnt;

    for( cnt=0 ;*ptp; ) {
        node *del;
        if( strcmp((*ptp)->entry, phrase) ) { // not the one we want
             ptp = &(*ptp)->next;
             continue; 
             }
          /* when we get here, ptp MUST point to the pointer that points at the node we wish to delete
          */
        del = *ptp;
        *ptp = (*ptp)->next;
        free(del);
        cnt++;
        }
    return cnt; // the number of deleted nodes
}

Update: and a driver program to test it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

typedef struct  list {
        struct list *next;
        char entry[20];
        } node;

void node_add( node **ptp, char *str)
{
node *new;

for (   ; *ptp; ptp = &(*ptp)->next) {
        if (strcmp ((*ptp)->entry, str) < 0) continue;
        }
new = malloc (sizeof *new);
strcpy(new->entry, str);
new->next = *ptp;
*ptp = new;
}

int main (void)
{
node *root = NULL;
unsigned cnt;

node_add (& root, "aaa" );
node_add (& root, "aaa" );
node_add (& root, "bbb" );
node_add (& root, "ccc" );
node_add (& root, "aaa" );
cnt = seachAndDestroy( &root, "bbb" );
printf("Cnt(bbb) := %u\n", cnt );
cnt = seachAndDestroy( &root, "ccc" );
printf("Cnt(ccc) := %u\n", cnt );
cnt = seachAndDestroy( &root, "aaa" );
printf("Cnt(aaa) := %u\n", cnt );
printf("Root now = %p\n", (void*) root );

return 0;
}

And the output:

plasser@pisbak:~/usenet$ ./a.out
Cnt(bbb) := 1
Cnt(ccc) := 1
Cnt(aaa) := 3
Root now = (nil)
share|improve this answer
    
If the search phrase is not found, the *root will contain NULL.. –  Shimon Rachlenko Sep 29 '13 at 10:58
    
+1 for minimal nesting and branching! –  jozxyqk Sep 29 '13 at 11:03
1  
Now I see your trick with root. Great! +1 –  Shimon Rachlenko Sep 29 '13 at 11:09
    
@wildplasser I think there's a bug in the searchAndDestroy(). My program was experiencing undefined behavior and when I commented out this function it stopped. Somehow node gets set to null. Input that causes this is when the value for phrase is the same for two calls in a row and the value consists of all the same letters. e.g. searchAndDestroy(root, "aaaa"); searchAndDestroy(root, "aaaa"); causes undefined behaviour –  Celeritas Sep 30 '13 at 21:54
    
The bug could be somewhere else. For example another function not setting ->next to NULL when initalising or deleting. Or The linked list could contain a cycle. It is not uncommon for this kind of "corrupt data" bugs to show up at unexpected places. And it can be expected that you will have fewer problems when you never delete anything at all. –  wildplasser Sep 30 '13 at 22:00

You are changing the root inside the function, thus you need to pass a double pointer:

bool findAndRemove(node** root, char phrase[21])
{
    node* iterate = *root;
    if(root != NULL && *root != NULL)
    {
        node* previous = NULL;
        while(iterate->next != NULL)
        {
            if(strcmp(iterate->entry, phrase) == 0)//found
            {
                if(previous == NULL)//node to delete is at head
                {
                    node* tmp = iterate;
                    *root = iterate->next;
                    free(tmp);
                    return true;
                }
                previous->next = iterate->next;
                free(iterate);
                return true;
            }
            previous = iterate;
            iterate = iterate->next;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This code won't work, you are altering the reference while you are iterating. In the end *root will point to the last node in the list. –  SJuan76 Sep 29 '13 at 10:42
    
How come it worked on all but the first node? –  Celeritas Sep 29 '13 at 10:44
    
@SJuan76 you are right, updated. –  Shimon Rachlenko Sep 29 '13 at 10:50
1  
@Celeritas When you delete the root node you need to modify the external pointer, otherwise you don't need to.. –  Shimon Rachlenko Sep 29 '13 at 10:51
    
There are too many innecessary special cases in your answer. See my solution (which contains only two if statements, and no else ) –  wildplasser Sep 29 '13 at 10:55

You construct a list by pointing to the first node.

Then you delete the first node, but do not update the pointer to the list to point to the second one

Just make your function check if you are deleting the first node, and always return a pointer to the first pointer of the final list. Alternatively, instead of node *root parameter, pass node **root so you can modifiy the reference in your function (although I don't like this way of working).

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