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So I have this question after browsing freelancer.com. What it(freelancer) does is, that whenever a new user registers..it automatically generates a html page for that user. For example, the user's username is joshm, then freelancer would generate www.domain.com/u/joshm.html , not only this page is generated, but also content is dynamically fetched in this .html page.

Using this technique is better than using www.domain.com/users.php?id=1 (which is prone to XSS/SQL Injection attacks).

My question is, how does this page get generated? and how is the information dynamically fetched to this HTML page ?

Thanks.

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closed as off-topic by Quentin, Ferdinand.kraft, Glavić, iCodez, Kon Sep 29 '13 at 18:52

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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3  
"Using this technique is better than using www.domain.com/users.php?id=1 (which is prone to XSS/SQL Injection attacks)." — Wrong. User input is user input. This is no less vulnerable to XSS or SQL Injection then any other way to get data from the user. You must sanitise/escape at the data format boundary. –  Quentin Sep 29 '13 at 11:44
    
possible duplicate of How do I give each registered user their own url using PHP? –  Quentin Sep 29 '13 at 11:44
3  
Look up mod_rewrite, those html pages are not static html files. –  Jakub Michálek Sep 29 '13 at 11:45
    
It's a rewrite engine, both of those addresses can point to the exactly same page. –  Jakub Kania Sep 29 '13 at 11:46
    
I don't see why this question is invalid or has downvotes. The OP makes assumptions which are wrong, but that doesn't mean the question itself is wrong. –  Stephan Muller Sep 29 '13 at 11:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using this technique is better than using www.domain.com/users.php?id=1 (which is prone to XSS/SQL Injection attacks).

Both techniques are equally vulnerable to whatever vulnerability you subject them to if you don't know what you're doing. Using a query string is not any more unsafe.

Moreover, /u/joshm.html is very likely just a "mask". The page still gets processed dynamically with database queries and all, being just as vulnerable as users.php?name=joshm. A URL is not the same as a file. Just because the URL says "joshm.html" does not in any way mean there's a file of that name physically on the harddisk anywhere. The web server can answer requests for this URL in any way it pleases, it doesn't have to use a file on disk. The web server is a program that listens on port 80 and responds to HTTP requests. It has nothing to do with the file system per se. .html is a good RESTful way to specify that you want the HTML version of the user joshm's information; it does not mean there's a file of that name.

Look into "URL rewriting" and "pretty URLs" for more about this topic.

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