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Code in question:

class Model < ActiveRecord::Base

    require 'Library'
    AN_ARRAY = [ 1, 2 ]
    THING = Classname.new.thing()

    def self.perform(param)
        # do stuff using THING, i.e. THING.do(something)
        do_things(param)
    end

    def self.do_things(param)
        # do stuff with AN_ARRAY and/or THING
    end

end

I'm not quite sure how Rails handles models. Do the top three statements execute only once? Is there only one THING, or might there be many THINGs? If I queue workers to execute self.perform(), will things be alright as long as the state of THING isn't changed? Should I be initializing THING in the functions themselves instead? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When the class is loaded, all the lines are evaluated by ruby once:

The following two lines define two constants since they begin with a capital letter. This means there is only one THING and one AN_ARRAY.

    AN_ARRAY = [ 1, 2 ]
    THING = Classname.new.thing()

The def statements below are also evaluated once and end up defining two class methods:

    def self.perform(param)
        # do stuff using THING, i.e. THING.do(something)
        do_things(param)
    end

    def self.do_things(param)
        # do stuff with AN_ARRAY and/or THING
    end

So, the methods should work as expected in your queue workers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer; to clarify, is it bad to have multiple workers share one THING, or should I instantiate one for each worker? –  Tsubaki Sep 30 '13 at 1:05
    
I normally avoid this as you will have to make sure that either everything in that THING is read-only and if it get modified, it does not adversely impact some other worker using the THING at the same time. The only reason for setting up such a shared-object is if THING is very expensive to create. This scenario is quite rare, though. You are much better off creating an instance for each worker. –  Rajesh Kolappakam Sep 30 '13 at 1:51
    
Thanks for the explanation, that's what I thought too. The THING I am using can get expensive, so I'll just have to experiment with these methods until I get it right. –  Tsubaki Sep 30 '13 at 5:50

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