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I am trying to count how many times a . appear in a single string passed in by the command line.

calling myprog "this...is a test."

returns The count is 0?

What am I doing wrong here?

Note: I know this code may look odd but is for education purposes

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

  int len = strlen(argv[1]);
  char *d = malloc (strlen(argv[1])+1);
  strcpy(d,argv[1]);
  char *p=d;
  int count;
  count=0;  
  while(*p){
    if (*p ==','){
      count++;
    }
    *p++;
  }

  printf("The count is: %d\n", count);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Watch out for memory leaks! You should remember to free everything you malloc. – fvrghl Sep 29 '13 at 14:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This code has quite a few...oddities. It's a little hard to guess which are intentional and which aren't, so let's go through it line by line and see what's there.

int len = strlen(argv[1]);
char *d = malloc (strlen(argv[1])+1);
strcpy(d,argv[1]);

It appears you probably intended to use len at some point, but as it stands right now, you get len, then re-compute the same value to use it. Presumably you intended something more like:

size_t len = strlen(argv[1]);
char *d = malloc(len+1);
strcpy(d, argv[1]);

I'd note, however, that there's really no reason to do any of this. Since you're just trying to examine the contents, you might as well just use argv[1] directly (or create another pointer to the same place and use that).

char *p=d;

This creates another pointer to the same location as d. You didn't really need d to start with, and you don't really need this either, but it's fairly harmless.

int count;
count=0;  

I'd (strongly) prefer to see count initialized rather than left uninitialized, then assigned a value afterwards. Since there's no possibility of its being negative, I'd probably also make it an unsigned type: size_t count = 0;

while(*p){
  if (*p ==','){
    count++;
  }
  *p++;
}

As others have already pointed out, you're comparing to the wrong value here. I'd also note, however, that when you have an initialization, a test, and an "increment" operation of some sort, you're almost certainly better off using a for loop instead of a while loop.

In addition, you have the increment part a bit wrong here. You really only want p++, not *p++.

for (char *p=d; *p; ++p)
   if (*p == '.')
       ++count;

When we get down to it, a slightly modified version of that loop is pretty much all we really need for the whole task though:

char const *p;
for (p = argv[1]; *p; ++p)
   if (*p == '.')
       ++count;
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing, thanks @Jerry Coffin – ojhawkins Sep 29 '13 at 14:29

You are counting the number of commas, not of periods. To count periods change the if statement to:

if (*p =='.'){
  count++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please no... @Joni – ojhawkins Sep 29 '13 at 14:04
    
Ahhhhhhhh!!! Yes now I feel stupid – ojhawkins Sep 29 '13 at 14:05

change

if (*p ==',')  

to

if (*p =='.')  

to count ..

share|improve this answer
    
Sitting in front of a computer for about 14 hrs now learning c, silly mistakes are made. Thanks @haccks – ojhawkins Sep 29 '13 at 14:07
    
@ojhawkins It happens ;) – haccks Sep 29 '13 at 14:12

I believe there is just a typo. Replace ',' with '.' and it will return "4", I've just tested it.

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