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In my app I'm using singleton class (as sharedInstance). Of course I need to use data that is stored in that singleton in multiple classes (view controllers). Because writing

[[[SingletonClass sharedInstance] arrayWithData] count] or

[[[SingletonClass sharedIntanse] arrayWithData] objectAtIndex:index] or some other methods that you use on array is not comfortable I thought to, in the begining of lifecycle of non-singleton class, assign property (strong, nonatomic) of that non-singleton class to have the same address as SingletonClass.

self.arrayPropertyOfOtherClassOne = [[SingletonClass sharedInstance] arrayWithData] and in some other class

self.arrayPropertyOfOtherClassTwo = [[SingletonClass sharedInstance] arrayWithData]

Is it good programming practice?

In my opinion there is nothing bad with it. Properties will point to the same address as property in Singleton and after non-singleton class will be destroyed also properties that where pointing to singleton so Reference Count = Refrence count - 1.

Am I correct?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my opinion there is nothing bad with it.

Generally you would want to maintain a pointer to the singleton, not to some object that it contains. By keeping a pointer to the object it contains you are adding a harder dependency and a requirement that that object doesn't change or changes in some defined way. If you have defined and documented that then it should be ok, but, usually the singleton should be able to destroy that object and create a new one as required so you may want to rethink keeping a reference to it.

Keeping a reference to the singleton itself is fine because that will never be destroyed.

Properties will point to the same address as property in Singleton

True

and after non-singleton class will be destroyed also properties that where pointing to singleton so Reference Count = Refrence count - 1.

True

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