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if (fwarrior != NULL) {
/* Go to the end of the file. */

 if (fseek(fwarrior, 0, SEEK_END) == 0) {
 /* Get the size of the file. */
 long bufsize = ftell(fwarrior);
 if (bufsize == -1) 
 {
     printf("Error in reading the size of file"); 
 }

 /* Allocate our buffer to that size. */
 buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * (bufsize + 1));

 /* Go back to the start of the file. */
 if (fseek(fwarrior, 0, SEEK_SET) == 0) 
 { 
     printf("Error = File is considered NULL"); 
 }

 /* Read the entire file into memory. */
 size_t newLen = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), bufsize, fwarrior);

 if (newLen == 0) 
 {
      fputs("Error reading file", stderr);
 } 

 else 
 {
      buffer[newLen] = '\0'; /* Just to be safe. */
 }

 }  
 }

When this code is run via VS2012 on Windows, what appears is "Error = File is considered NULL"

I am trying to assign the contents of a certain file into buffer and use sscanf later on to create a singly linked-list to assign the content of the file into their respective variables.

I just got the code above from a website and the maker of this code said the code above basically reads the entire content of the file then assigns them into the buffer so that we could use sscanf later.

Sample:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
typedef struct hero_data{
    char name[254];
    char title[254];
    int encoding;
    int startstr;
    double incstr;
    int startdex;
    double incdex;
    int startintel;
    double incintel;
    int basemindmg,basemaxdmg;
    double bat;
    double basearmor;
    struct hero_data *next;
    struct hero_data *type;
    struct hero_data *Class;
}hero;
int main()
{
hero *curr[] = {0};
hero *head;
hero *tail;
int totalwarrior = 0;
FILE *fwarrior;
char filename[256];
char *buffer = NULL;
size_t newLen;
printf("Name of Roster File for Warriors?(without .extension): \n");
scanf("%s",&filename);
strcat(filename,".txt");
fwarrior = fopen(filename,"r");

if (fwarrior != NULL) {
    /* Go to the end of the file. */
    if (fseek(fwarrior, 0, SEEK_END) == 0) {
        /* Get the size of the file. */
        long bufsize = ftell(fwarrior);
        if (bufsize == -1) 
        {
            printf("Error in reading the size of file"); 

        }

    /* Allocate our buffer to that size. */
    buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * (bufsize + 1));

    /* Go back to the start of the file. */
    if (fseek(fwarrior, 0, SEEK_SET) == 0) //So is this the right way to use fseek?
    { 

    /* Read the entire file into memory. */
    size_t newLen = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), bufsize, fwarrior);

    if (newLen == 0) 
    {
        fputs("Error reading file", stderr);
    } 
    else 
    {
        buffer[newLen] = '\0'; /* Just to be safe. */
    }
}
}   

while(fgets(buffer, sizeof buffer, fwarrior) != NULL)
{
if(13 == sscanf(buffer,"%s[^,] , %s[^,] , %d , %d , %lf , %d , %lf , %d , %lf , %d , %d , %lf , %lf", &curr[totalwarrior]->name,&curr[totalwarrior]->title,&curr[totalwarrior]->encoding,&curr[totalwarrior]->startstr,&curr[totalwarrior]->incstr,&curr[totalwarrior]->startdex,&curr[totalwarrior]->incdex,&curr[totalwarrior]->startintel,&curr[totalwarrior]->incintel,&curr[totalwarrior]->basemindmg,&curr[totalwarrior]->basemaxdmg,&curr[totalwarrior]->bat,&curr[totalwarrior]->basearmor))
{
    if (head == NULL)
    {
        head = curr[totalwarrior];      
    }
    else 
    {
        tail->next=curr[totalwarrior];
    }
    tail = curr[totalwarrior];

    if (head!=NULL)
    {
        curr[totalwarrior] = head;
        do {
        printf("%s\n%s\n%d\n%d\n%.1lf\n%d\n%.1lf\n%d\n%.1lf\n%d\n%d\n%.1lf\n%.1lf\n\n",curr[totalwarrior]->name,curr[totalwarrior]->title,curr[totalwarrior]->encoding,curr[totalwarrior]->startstr,curr[totalwarrior]->incstr,curr[totalwarrior]->startdex,curr[totalwarrior]->incdex,curr[totalwarrior]->startintel,curr[totalwarrior]->incintel,curr[totalwarrior]->basemindmg,curr[totalwarrior]->basemaxdmg,curr[totalwarrior]->bat,curr[totalwarrior]->basearmor);
        curr[totalwarrior] = curr[totalwarrior]->next = curr[totalwarrior+1];
        curr[totalwarrior] = NULL; 
        printf("Before Total %d\n",totalwarrior);
        totalwarrior++;
        printf("Now Total %d\n",totalwarrior);
        }while(curr[totalwarrior-1] != NULL);
    } free(curr[totalwarrior]);
}
}
}
}
//I created a typedef struct named curr that is in the form of array. It is legit.
//I do not know the limit of the file so that's why I am trying to use the function above to get the size of the file in order to use `sscanf`.

//I made the code `13 == sscanf(...)` because within the file, there will be multiple "sets" of data that are in the set of 13 variables. Everytime when the program reads the 13th variable, I will add counter to `[totalwarrior]` of the typedef struct named `curr`.

Here is the sample file that the program will read:

Relay Chestdrop
Snow Damsel
230
16
1.7
16
1.6
21
2.9
38
44
1.7
1.24
Linnea Reversa
Vanquisher
214
18
1.5
16
1.5
27
3.2
40
58
1.7
1.24
Kyle
Hoarder
255
19
1.7
20
1.9
22
2.5
35
41
1.7
1.8
Leo
Wiccan Monster
236
16
1.7
15
1.5
22
3
42
48
1.7
1.1
Changer
Changer
191
19
2
24
3
17
1.5
37
46
1.6
1.36
Consortio Piercoptic
Elvish Sharpshooter
177
16
1.7
21
2.9
15
2.6
36
42
1.7
1.94
Tinklez
Osteoarcher
149
15
1.6
22
3
16
1.55
37
43
1.7
2.08
Weeeeheeee-urrr
Silhouette Devil
180
15
2
20
2.9
18
2
35
41
1.7
1.8
Deckard Haemofoot
Bovine Captain
71
24
2.3
14
1.5
23
1.6
47
57
1.7
2.96
Shelgar
Blessed Hero
92
21
2.4
20
2.4
18
1.5
42
51
1.6
1.8
Tomahawk
Genghis Tycoon
120
25
2.5
20
2.2
18
1.6
49
53
1.7
1.8
Beelzebub
Ruinbearer
108
26
3.2
11
0.9
13
2.1
53
69
1.7
0.54
share|improve this question
    
Post the shortest example demonstrating the problem that we can actually compile. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 29 '13 at 16:56
    
post the part related to your problem –  Umer Farooq Sep 29 '13 at 17:01
    
This: buffer[++newLen] = '\0'; should be this: buffer[newLen] = '\0'; by the way. If you read 10 bytes, you want to set buffer[10] to \0, not buffer[11]. You'll write past the end of the buffer if you actually read bufsize bytes, here. It's also not "just to be safe" - it's necessary (if you're dealing with strings, at least), because fread() won't add a terminating NUL for you. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 29 '13 at 17:07
    
I have included the actual code. It does nothing when compiled and run –  Beginner C Sep 29 '13 at 23:13

1 Answer 1

fseek is operating correctly, but you misinterpret the result.

Return Value

If successful, the function returns zero. Otherwise, it returns non-zero value. If a read or write error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set.

(from CPP Reference)

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