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Before AJAX was popular, it was possible to convert between id's and entities by using a custom property editor and registering that in your controllers. So if you had a User form backing object that contained a Company, if company.id was 5, Spring would call your custom property editor to so that you could go fetch the Company with id 5 and set it onto your user.company property.

Now in the Ajax way of doing things, we have similar requirements. Instead of using a form backing object, we want to do an HTTP POST or PUT of a User object as JSON data and have Spring automatically convert that JSON to a User object on our behalf. Spring has made this possible with the @RequestBody annotation, and by using Jackson to marshall the JSON back and forth to Java objects.

This is just a fictitious example. Imagine a User containing a Company object with the appropriate getters/setters.

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT)
public void create(@Valid @RequestBody User user) {
    userService.saveUser(user);
}

Since property editors are a thing of the past as far as Spring is concerned, we are expected to use the new Conversion Service API. For my application, I have successfully created a factory that does what my old property editor did before - converting id's back to entities.

My question is, how can I get Spring to call into the conversion service during or after Jackson marshals the JSON data? I know it is possible to create a custom JsonDeserializer, but I find writing/testing these to be a pain and lengthy process as I need to do it for a massive number of entities, and each deserializer would take anywhere from 60 to 200 lines of code each.

I'd love it if Spring could do the id to entity mapping for me on my behalf, just as it did for form backing objects. Is there a way?

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Just so I understand correctly: your handler method (annotated with @RequestBody) returns a User object. Can you show your User class and Company class and the expected output? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 29 '13 at 18:00
    
The return type is not really relevant, as marshaling data back to the client using Jackson tends to work as expected. The problem is when data is coming into the controller. Imagine I have JSON that has a user with a nested company. That company.id inside of the Json is 5. I want Spring to be smart enough to fetch the company using my ConverterServiceFactory before it arrives in the controller. I can do it with a JsonDeserializer, but I want to avoid lots of manual plumbing if I can help it. –  egervari Sep 29 '13 at 18:06
    
So the JSON contains the id, but you want the deserializer to actually go fetch the object from some DataSource and use that to build a User object? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 29 '13 at 18:13
    
Yep! :) We did this before with form backing objects no problem. The problem is very similar with @RequestBody. I'd like to get the same type of behaviour, even though the technical problem is a little different. –  egervari Sep 29 '13 at 18:15

2 Answers 2

It will only work the root object User in this case it will not work for nested components. Spring Data REST has a `DomainClassConverter' which you can take a look at.

Basically you want to create ConditionalGenericConverter which checks if it can convert the requested object (i.e. can it be loaded by the EntityManager/SessionFactory). (A non-conditional version is here.

This all goes a bit against REST (basically) to do the lookup on the serverside as you should be sending everything needed with the request (Representational State Transfer and Hypermedia as Transfer Engine of All State). But that is for another discussion :) .

Links

  1. Domain Entity Converter blog
  2. Spring Reference guide
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The M. Deinum's answer was great. But for a practical work , think about AOP ;) It can be interesting to use it in your problem :).

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