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I'm making a function that replaces letters for others, the problem is that it does not work as I want.

Source

function encode(texto:string): string;

var
  cadena: string;
  i: integer;

const
  letras: array [1 .. 26] of string = ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h',
    'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w',
    'x', 'y', 'z');
const
  in_letras: array [1 .. 26] of string =
    ('z', 'y', 'x', 'w', 'v', 'u', 't', 's', 'r', 'q', 'p', 'o', 'n', 'm', 'l',
    'k', 'j', 'i', 'h', 'g', 'f', 'e', 'd', 'c', 'b', 'a');

begin


    for i := Low(letras) to High(letras) do
    begin
      texto := StringReplace(texto, letras[i], in_letras[i],[rfReplaceAll]);
    end;


Result := texto;

end;

Edit2.Text := encode(Edit1.Text);

Use the function encode () returns in Edit1 and I Edig1, which should not happen because I did something wrong when the replacement function

share|improve this question
6  
You can't replace chars this way. Consider what happens if you replace e.g. d -> w and then by that iteration go to w. It turns already changed w back to d. –  TLama Sep 29 '13 at 18:42
    
either that, or you need to work with a 2nd string (different to the passed-in variable) and then assign that to result. –  Matt Allwood Sep 30 '13 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Easiest straight to the point solution is a double loop:

function encode(texto: string): string;
var
  I, J: Integer;
const
  letras: array [1 .. 26] of Char = ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h',
    'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w',
    'x', 'y', 'z');
const
  in_letras: array [1 .. 26] of Char =
    ('z', 'y', 'x', 'w', 'v', 'u', 't', 's', 'r', 'q', 'p', 'o', 'n', 'm', 'l',
    'k', 'j', 'i', 'h', 'g', 'f', 'e', 'd', 'c', 'b', 'a');
begin
  for J := 1 to length(texto) do
    for I := Low(letras) to High(letras) do
    begin
      if texto[J] = letras[I] then
      begin
        texto[J] := in_letras[I];
        Break;
      end;
    end;
  Result := texto;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I'm not sure that this method is the most efficient, but it answers the OP's intention: "function that replaces letters for others". if the in_letras is random/shuffled this method will work as well. –  kobik Sep 30 '13 at 13:12
1  
Sigh. Whatever happened to logic, reasoning and arithmetic. Also, you access the string's non-existent 0-th element. Expect corruption for exceptionally long strings (!!) and access violation for empty string. –  David Heffernan Oct 1 '13 at 19:09
    
Nice. Thanks Alfons –  Jose Martinez Oct 2 '13 at 22:25
    
David, Fixed the non-existend-0th element bug (thanx for the code review). Wrote the code so its easy and to the point, one could possibly write a more optimized piece of code, but this piece could also be read and understanded by new or non-programmers. Which was the point of my post. –  Alfons Oct 10 '13 at 8:29

It does not work because you are progressively destroying the input in the loop. Each time around the loop you operate on the modified string rather than operating on the original input string.

The basic problem is that once you have processed a character, you must not process it again. You must process each input character once only. You process each character 26 times. Your approach can never be fixed.

You would be better with something like this:

function encode(const input: string): string;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := input;
  for i := 1 to Length(Result) do 
    if (Result[i]>='a') and (Result[i]<='z') then
      Result[i] := Chr(ord('a') + ord('z') - ord(Result[i]));
end;

Your function implements the following mapping:

a -> z
b -> y
c -> x
....
y -> b
z -> a

The ordinal value of b is one more than that of a. And the ordinal value of c is one more than b. And so on. So the ordinal value of z is 25 more than a.

So, let us suppose that the ordinal of a is 0, the ordinal of b is 1 and so on. Then we are mapping 0 to 25, 1 to 24, 2 to 23 and so on. If that were so then the function we needed would be:

output = 25 - input

or perhaps you might write it like this:

output = ord('z') - input

Now, as it happens, the ordinal value of a is not equal to 0. So in order to make this function work we need to shift the values to allow for the ordinal value of a. So the function becomes:

output = ord('a') + ord('z') - input
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks David Heffernan but your solution is hard to understand me, so I wanted to ask how I can use your code with the arrays designed. –  Jose Martinez Sep 29 '13 at 18:58
    
Not hard to understand. convert 26 to 1, 25 to 2, 24 to 3, ... 2 to 25, 1 to 26. You could do it with a lookup table if you wanted. Anyway, if you don't like my solution, you can go back to yours if you prefer. –  David Heffernan Sep 29 '13 at 19:02
    
ok, you're right, I hope I do not bother you, but as the decode your code I mean that it return back –  Jose Martinez Sep 29 '13 at 19:12
    
Please ask that question again. I don't understand. Are you asking for a decode as well as an encode? Well, same function does both. Surely you can work that out yourself. You just need to think about what you are doing. –  David Heffernan Sep 29 '13 at 19:17
    
Thanks David Heffernan. –  Jose Martinez Sep 29 '13 at 19:44

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