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I am updating an existing system and need to stick to some of the code already used. There may be none or many records in table n per main_id. There are approximately 40k records in main and approximately 330k records in n.

I need to select only records from main which don't have a n.date within the last 6 months.

Unfortunately every way I've tried has come out very slow.

main.main_id
main.field1
main.field2
main.field3

n.n_id
n.main_id
n.date
n.field1
n.field2
n.field3

The query is of the form

SELECT distinct(main.main_id) FROM main LEFT JOIN...

I have tried placing subqueries in a variety of places, also views, temporary tables, adding indexes and so far nothing has made it near reasonable speed.

Unfortunately I haven't got a list of things I've tried so far as I was hoping I'd get it to work, so didn't note them down and it's getting late now!

I suspect if I ran the query straight from the n. table it may be a lot quicker, but that would require a massive rewrite. There's quite a few other elements to the query, but it's done in under two seconds with the table joined, but without this.

This is about the simplest it could possibly be - normally more WHERE clauses and JOINs.

EXPLAIN 
SELECT distinct(`main`.`main_id`),`morefields`,`morefields2`
FROM main LEFT JOIN anothertable ON anothertable    anothertable.a_n = main.a 
LEFT JOIN anothertable2 ON anothertable2.g_n = main.CG 
LEFT JOIN anothertable3 ON anothertable3.t_n = main.t 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT max(DateTS) as note_date, main_id FROM n GROUP BY main_id) n_sub ON main.main_id=n_sub.main_id
WHERE main.deleted = '0' 
AND n_sub.note_date < DATE_SUB(now(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH)
ORDER BY main.morefields ASC LIMIT 0, 30;
+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref                        | rows   | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | <derived2>  | ALL    | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL                       |  40324 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | main    | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | n_sub.cust_no          |      1 | Using where                                  |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | anothertable       | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.maij.area          |      1 |                                              |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | anothertable2 | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.main.CG |      1 |                                              |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | anothertable3  | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.main.t          |      1 |                                              |
|  2 | DERIVED     | n  | index  | NULL          | main_id | 4       | NULL                       | 285961 |                                              |
+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
6 rows in set (30.25 sec)
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2  
Whatever your current query is, can you add the word EXPLAIN to the beginning of it and post the results? Example: EXPLAIN SELECT distinct(main.main_id) FROM main LEFT JOIN... –  jerdiggity Sep 29 '13 at 22:34
    
Added to the main text as it was too big to put in here. –  gee Sep 30 '13 at 0:18
    
I don't see index columns in main query. When you use JOIN it is faster when use column with index to match with. –  bksi Sep 30 '13 at 1:10
    
Other thing i see Why you don't put note_date < DATE_SUB... in the JOIN query. This way you will reduce rows returned by it and you will make this JOIN faster. –  bksi Sep 30 '13 at 1:14
    
main_id is the Primary Key, not sure why it's working like this - something to do with it being listed as derived? I did have the note_date < DATE_SUB stuff in the join initially I believe, but have tried a lot of different variations on it. With the current query, I can't directly move it in because it's got a 'max' on the date field. –  gee Sep 30 '13 at 10:43
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2 Answers

You should be able to completely and simply get list of IDs with no date records in the last 6 months based on a left-join looking FOR activity WITHIN the last 6 months and apply a WHERE clause for NULL of that join.

SELECT 
      m.main_id,
      m.a,
      m.CG,
      m.t,
      m.morefields,
      m.morefields2,
   from
      main m
         left join n
            ON m.main_id = n.main_id
            and n.note_date > date_sub( now(), interval 6 month )
   where
          m.deleted = '0'
      AND n.main_id is null
   order by 
      m.morefields asc
   limit
      0, 30

Now, you have those other joins where you may want fields from those too. If so, I would wrap the above and use THAT as the join basis... I use alias "PQ" to identify the "PreQuery" to the rest of the join.

select 
      PQ.*,
      A_T1.SomeField(s),
      A_T2.SomeField(s),
      A_T3.SomeField(s)
   from 
      ( entire first query ) as PQ
         left join anothertable A_T1
            on PQ.a = A_T1.a_n
         left join anothertable2 A_T2
            on PQ.CG = A_T2.g_n
         left join anothertable2 A_T3
            on PQ.CG = A_T3.t

Since the inner query has the limit of 30 applied, we don't need to re-apply a limit again (unless the "another" tables will cause some Cartesian results and produce more records per single main ID.)

For obvious hiding of actual data/context, I am only guessing on actual column(s) you are truly joining with.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a lot better, taking around 4 seconds. However, it would seem to do ever better (I haven't tried it fully) if I move the from to the n table. Unfortunately changing the from messes up the entire architecture of the existing system, which I was trying to avoid. Sorry, should have been clearer - trying to think now and I think that's main restriction. So I can add in what I want in the rest pretty much. This is one component of a large search and the other aspects work from the main table. –  gee Sep 30 '13 at 11:24
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Based on this:

+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref          | rows   | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     |<derived2>   | ALL    | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL         |  40324 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | PRIMARY     |main         | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | n_sub.cust_no|      1 | Using where                                  |
|  1 | PRIMARY     |anothertable | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.maij.area |      1 |                                              |
|  1 | PRIMARY     |anothertable2| eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.main.CG   |      1 |                                              |
|  1 | PRIMARY     |anothertable3| eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | db.main.t    |      1 |                                              |
|  2 | DERIVED     |n            | index  | NULL          | main_id | 4       | NULL         | 285961 |                                              |
+----+-------------+-------------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+

... it looks to me like there's a problem with your indexes. For example, the first line says that it's scanning 40,324 full rows, in their entirety, for data. Worse yet, it looks like no index(es) are being used (the key column) because no indexes are specified in your query (possible_keys).

Give this a try, or something similar (unless I'm mistaken), but be sure to try it on a backed up copy of the database before making any changes to your actual database:

ALTER TABLE `main` ADD INDEX ( `main_id` )

EDIT:

If that doesn't help, my next suggestion would be to try changing this line:

LEFT JOIN (SELECT max(DateTS) as note_date, main_id FROM n GROUP BY main_id) n_sub ON main.main_id=n_sub.main_id

To something like this:

LEFT JOIN (SELECT max(DateTS) as note_date, main_id FROM n GROUP BY main_id) n_sub ON main.main_id=n_sub.main_id AND n_sub.note_date < DATE_SUB(now(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH)

Which should allow you to delete this line altogether:

AND n_sub.note_date < DATE_SUB(now(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH)

Another possibility would be to try this instead:

SELECT distinct(`main`.`main_id`),`morefields`,`morefields2`
FROM main
-- Maybe change the next line to an INNER JOIN..?
LEFT JOIN n ON main.main_id = n.main_id
LEFT JOIN anothertable ON anothertable.a_n = main.a 
LEFT JOIN anothertable2 ON anothertable2.g_n = main.CG 
LEFT JOIN anothertable3 ON anothertable3.t_n = main.t 
WHERE main.deleted = '0'
GROUP BY main.main_id HAVING MAX(n.DateTS) < DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH)
ORDER BY main.morefields ASC LIMIT 0, 30;
share|improve this answer
    
main_id is the Primary Key, but I tried adding the index anyway - as expected no change in the Explain or time taken. Not sure why it's working like this - something to do with it being listed as derived? –  gee Sep 30 '13 at 10:35
    
@gee please see my latest revision. –  jerdiggity Sep 30 '13 at 23:37
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