Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a time-sensitive application that gets data from a third party library. What would be the performance hit associated with wrapping their objects into more appropriate interfaces for my application?

Note: I am posting an answer here (Q&A style), but if it's wrong please correct me!

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Raedwald, Sean Owen, Alex, Szymon, codeMagic Apr 30 at 15:24

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
That would depend on the kind of wrapping done. –  Raedwald Oct 4 '13 at 7:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's some overhead with indirection, but it's hard to measure. The OP's benchmark took about 4 ns per iteration while mine needs about 1 ns (for the fastest experiment). This means that they were measuring mostly the overhead of the ArrayList, Iterator, and cycle probably together with a virtual call overhead.

The overhead to be measured is so small that you need to use arrays and either add an inner loop or use masking for accessing them.

The results of my benchmark show that there's a measureable overhead of both using an interface and an indirection. This overhead ranges from maybe 20% to 50%, which looks like a lot. However, the important part is 20-50% of what. It's a fraction of specially crafted benchmark doing nothing but exercising the code. In any realistic piece code the relative overhead will be ten, hundred, or thousand times lower.

So unless you're designing a high-performance library doing some very basic and fast operations, just forget it. Use indirection and interfaces at will and concentrate on good design. Even if performance is important, there are probably other places where you can gain more.

WrappingBenchmark

share|improve this answer
    
I think the overhead matters less as a percentage and more as an absolute, in this case. Your last paragraph explains why. Thank you for doing the work to agree with my answer. While performance is very important in my application, I'm glad to see that I can stop beating my head against the wall by NOT wrapping my data feed without worry of significant performance loss. –  durron597 Oct 4 '13 at 13:57

After attempting to work with their classes for months, today I decided to make a test. It seems that it doesn't add much if any overhead. Here are the results - which are actually not all that consistent, here's one that actually has unwrapped being SLOWER:

 0% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Unwrapped} 3.96 ns; ?=0.02 ns @ 3 trials
33% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Copy} 3.93 ns; ?=0.01 ns @ 3 trials
67% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Backing} 3.94 ns; ?=0.01 ns @ 3 trials

benchmark   ns linear runtime
Unwrapped 3.96 ==============================
     Copy 3.93 =============================
  Backing 3.94 =============================

vm: java
trial: 0

Source code (Caliper 0.5-rc1, Guava 2.0+):

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Random;

import com.google.caliper.Runner;
import com.google.caliper.SimpleBenchmark;
import com.google.common.collect.Iterables;

public class WrapperTest {
    public static class Unwrapped {
        private int inner;

        public Unwrapped(int inner) {
            this.inner = inner;
        }

        public int getInner() {
            return inner;
        }
    }

    public static interface Outer {
        public int getOuter();
    }

    public static class CopyOuter implements Outer {
        private int outer;

        public CopyOuter(int outer) {
            this.outer = outer;
        }

        public int getOuter() {
            return outer;
        }
    }

    public static class BackingOuter implements Outer {
        private Unwrapped inner;

        public BackingOuter(Unwrapped inner) {
            this.inner = inner;
        }

        public int getOuter() {
            return inner.getInner();
        }
    }

    public static class TestBenchmark extends SimpleBenchmark {
        private Iterable<Unwrapped> cycle;

        @Override
        protected void setUp() {
            List<Unwrapped> backing = new ArrayList<Unwrapped>(16384);
            Random r = new Random();
            for(int i = 0; i < 16384; i++) {
                backing.add(new Unwrapped(Math.abs(r.nextInt())));
            }
            cycle = Iterables.cycle(backing);
        }

        public long timeUnwrapped(int reps) {
            long total = 0;
            Iterator<Unwrapped> iter = cycle.iterator();
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                total += iter.next().getInner();
            }
            return total;
        }

        public long timeCopy(int reps) {
            long total = 0;
            Iterator<Unwrapped> iter = cycle.iterator();
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                total += new CopyOuter(iter.next().getInner()).getOuter();
            }
            return total;
        }

        public long timeBacking(int reps) {
            long total = 0;
            Iterator<Unwrapped> iter = cycle.iterator();
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                total += new BackingOuter(iter.next()).getOuter();
            }
            return total;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Runner.main(TestBenchmark.class, new String[0]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I really don't think your benchmark is so precise so you could say that 3.93 is really faster than 3.96. I guess the measurement error is something like 5% in general and maybe more in your case as things like cycle probably dominate the run time. Moreover, the difference between the performance in a microbenchmark and in a real application can be even bigger. –  maaartinus Sep 30 '13 at 4:16
1  
I wouldn't care about the cost of wrapping unless you're wrapping trivial methods executed many times. I guess the JIT can optimize quite some of the cost away. –  maaartinus Sep 30 '13 at 4:18
    
@maaartinus Thanks for your reply. Yeah I consider 3.93 approximately equal to 3.96. Creating the cyclical iterable happens in setUp, so it doesn't affect the runtime. I just did it to ensure there wouldn't be an IndexOutOfBounds exception. –  durron597 Sep 30 '13 at 13:38
    
My problem with it is that it probably has an overhead bigger than what you're trying to measure. I'd go for in inner loop over an array instead. When you use a thousand elements, L1 cache misses must show. –  maaartinus Sep 30 '13 at 18:46
    
@maaartinus If you would give me some code as an answer I'd be happy to upvote –  durron597 Oct 1 '13 at 0:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.