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Here's something I keep struggling to figure out the best solution to. I've had this problem while working with PHP and Java so it's a fundamental understanding of OOP issue. Examples are in PHP.

Let's say I have a few object's here. Song, Artist, ArtistProfile, User.

So in some instances I want the ArtistProfile and an array of User objects (subscribers) when I call the Artist (e.g. the artist's profile page), in other instances I only want the Artist info, like when viewing a page of the song.

Should I be nesting one object as part of another or should I be creating more specific objects for different usages.

Option 1: Nested

Class Song {
   private $songId;
   private $songName;
   private $year;
   private $Artist; //Artist object
}

Class Artist {
   private $artistId;
   private $name;
   private $age;
   private $subscriberArr; //Array of User objects which then have more nested objects such as a Role object, Profile object
   private $profile; //Profile object which could also have more nested objects
}

Class User {
   private $userId;
   private $name;
   private $age;
   private $role; //Role object
   private $profile; //UserProfile object
}

Option 2: Build more objects

Class Song {
   private $songId;
   private $songName;
   private $year;
   private $artistId;
}

Class Artist {
   private $artistId;
   private $age;
   private $name;
}

Class User {
   private $userId;
   private $name;
   private $age;
   private $roleId;
}

Class SongWithArtist {
   private $song; //Basic Song object
   private $artist; //Basic Artist object
}

Class ArtistWithProfile {
   private $artist; //Basic artist object
   private $profile; //Profile object
   private $subscriberArr; //UserDisplay object containing basic User object
}

 Class UserWithProfile {}

Option 1 means wasting a lot of time/resources grabbing information I may not need for that page but easier to manage. Option 2 is messy and requires keeping track of which object is what but faster and far less db calls. Which is the 'correct' option and/or is there a 3rd correct option?

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Could you simply create a getter method for the property that loads it from the DB when it is required? Alternatively/as well as this, you could pass in which fields are required as a bit vector to the constructor. – Zack Newsham Sep 30 '13 at 0:30
    
Is that possible if I'm using MVC? Wouldn't I need it all loaded in the controller? Also, if I were loading Artist like you suggest, wouldn't it still try to load all the nested objects within it (profile, subscriber users, their profile, etc)? – user103555 Sep 30 '13 at 0:35
    
What framework are you using? I wouldn't think that the default action of any model is to load everything in related classes unless you specified it, for example in Yii, you have a relationships() method, where you specify the related classes to load - if you dont specify there you can still load. No, you won't need to do this in a controller - you can do this in the model code itself - look up __get in PHP, it's a magic method that allows you to specify getter methods for private/non existing variables. (will continue in next comment) – Zack Newsham Sep 30 '13 at 0:43
    
As to your issue with loading sub-sub classes (user->artist->songs for example) if artist lives in user, and is not loaded by default, then when you load it you could have it not load songs by default as well. – Zack Newsham Sep 30 '13 at 0:44
    
I'm using Laravel. I've always coded my own queries, I just find I can write more optimized queries to have my app run faster. Should I trust a framework's built in data access libs? From reading examples on different framework documentation pages, it seems they always run multiple small queries vs a more efficient one. – user103555 Sep 30 '13 at 1:26

Two things:

  1. Stick to the age-old "is a" vs. "has a" rule for deciding between inheritance vs. composition.

  2. Don't worry about optimizing queries (especially if it involves fundamental changes to object design) unless you've both determined that your specific performance requirements aren't being met and you've profiled your application and determined that this is where your bottlenecks are. "OOP" is a conceptual way of organizing and representing information; design your objects to represent your intentions and information precisely and accurately. Do not optimize prematurely. In any case, a decent ORM (especially one with lazy load support, e.g. Hibernate with Java) and a well-designed, properly normalized database (which frequently naturally comes out of designing business objects first) will generally perform well with most sane design approaches.

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