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It's been a long time since I've used C++, been using Javascript in my free time and now I'm not sure exactly what I remember.

Basically I just need to separate a string into parts by looking at the spaces.

All the links I've seen are homemade functions, but I could have sworn there was a way to do it using the standard library by using streams, but again, I'm having a tough time recalling it and my google results aren't helping either.

Keep in mind that it isn't a stream I am taking from, it's just a string like "Bob Accountant 65 retired" and I have to extract each item in the string to its own data field. I've been messing with ifstreams and ofstreams but I'm not even sure what I'm doing, having forgot the syntax for it.

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3  
strtok can be used. cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strtok –  thefourtheye Sep 30 '13 at 2:11
    
How would I convert my string into a char pointer, though? –  user2419560 Sep 30 '13 at 2:16
    
std::string::c_str () will return a null-terminated string for use in C stdlib functions that require null-terminated strings (such as strtok). Be aware that strtok (...) is not thread-safe in its usual form, so the answers below that suggest using the C++ stdlib are probably more versatile/robust. –  Andon M. Coleman Sep 30 '13 at 2:22

3 Answers 3

std::strtok is the C-style way to do it. You might be thinking of using a std::stringstream, e.g.:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::string input = "foo bar baz  quxx\nducks";
    std::stringstream ss(input);

    std::string word;
    while (ss >> word) {
        std::cout << word << '\n';
    }
}

When run, that displays:

foo
bar
baz
quxx
ducks

If you want to read data from a std::stringstream (or any type of std::istream, really) into a specific data type, you can follow @JerryCoffin's excellent suggestion of overloading the stream operator>> for your data type:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

struct Employee {
    std::string name;
    std::string title;
    int age;
    std::string status;
};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream &is, Employee &e) {
    return is >> e.name >> e.title >> e.age >> e.status;
}

int main() {
    std::string input = "Bob Accountant 65 retired";
    std::stringstream ss(input);

    Employee e;
    ss >> e;

    std::cout << "Name: " << e.name
        << " Title: " << e.title
        << " Age: " << e.age
        << " Status: " << e.status
        << '\n';
}
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What would I do if I just wanted to put them in their own data fields, not display them to the console? –  user2419560 Sep 30 '13 at 2:27
    
use std::vector<string> stringVect; Instead of calling cout, you should call stringVect.push_back() –  qxixp Sep 30 '13 at 3:24
    
@user2419560: I've updated this answer to include a second example of reading data into a struct. –  Nate Kohl Sep 30 '13 at 14:02

You can do it without an explicit loop like this:

string s = "Bob Accountant 65 retired";
vector<string> vs;
istringstream iss(s);
copy(istream_iterator<string>(iss), istream_iterator<string>(), back_inserter(vs));

std::copy reads everything from the string stream created on the third line, and pushes it into the vector created on the second line.

Here is a demo on ideone.

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From the looks of things, you're trying to read a logical record from a string. For that, I'd do something like this:

struct record { 
    std::string name;
    std::string position;
    int age;
    std::string status;
};

std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, record &r) { 
    return i >> r.name >> r.position >> r.age >> r.status;
}

This lets you read data from a stringstream to a record of the specified fields. It'll also, incidentally, let you read record objects from other types of streams as well (e.g., from a file using an fstream).

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