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I can't figure it out, Code:

smallSum :: (Ord a, Integral a) => a -> a
smallSum n 
    | n < 0 = 0
    | (n < 20) = n + smallSum (n - 1)
    | otherwise = error "Number needs to be in 1..10"

fastSumOfSeriesLength :: (Ord a, Integral a) => a -> a
fastSumOfSeriesLength x 
    | x < 10 = smallSum x
    | x >= 10 = sum (take (rest - 1) [dif !! (firstDigit - 1), dif !! (firstDigit - 1) + 100..]) + smallList !! (firstDigit - 1)
    where
        smallList = [smallSum x | x <- [1..10]]
        largeList = [smallSum x | x <- [11..20]]
        dif = [l - s | l <- largeList, s <- smallList]
        firstDigit = x `mod` 10
        rest = x `div` 10

Error:

ghci> :r
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( learn.hs, interpreted )

learn.hs:194:32:
    Could not deduce (a ~ Int)
    from the context (Ord a, Integral a)
      bound by the type signature for
                 fastSumOfSeriesLength :: (Ord a, Integral a) => a -> a
      at learn.hs:191:26-54
      `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
          the type signature for
            fastSumOfSeriesLength :: (Ord a, Integral a) => a -> a
          at learn.hs:191:26
    In the first argument of `(-)', namely `rest'
    In the first argument of `take', namely `(rest - 1)'
    In the first argument of `sum', namely
      `(take
          (rest - 1)
          [dif !! (firstDigit - 1), dif !! (firstDigit - 1) + 100 .. ])'
Failed, modules loaded: none.

Im looking for someone to point out whats wrong, what it would look light working and what I need to google to learn more about this error.

share|improve this question
    
A quick tip: you can remove the type declaration of your functions and then load it in GHCi. With the :t expr command you can ask the type of a function. – Boldizsár Németh Sep 30 '13 at 6:20

Check out the types of (!!) and take:

*Main> :t (!!)
(!!) :: [a] -> Int -> a
*Main> :t take
take :: Int -> [a] -> [a]

Since you use these on expressions with the same type as x, this means x must be an Int -- but you declared that this function should work on any kind of (integral) number. (If you read the error slowly, hopefully you will be able to see it saying this.) The simplest fix is to import Data.List and use genericIndex and genericTake instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I would rather say the easiest fix is deleting the type declaration or making it Int -> Int, but that depends if he needs polymorphism. – MdxBhmt Sep 30 '13 at 6:23
1  
@MdxBhmt Probably deleting the whole file is the easiest. But my criteria for "simple" are less effable than my criteria for "easy". =) – Daniel Wagner Sep 30 '13 at 6:38

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