Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an NSString which contains unicode characters itself.

Ex:

It's blank.\u000e test \u000f

The NSString's length is 19.

Here, \u000e and \u000f are Unicode characters.

I convert the above mentioned NSString to an NSMutableAttributedString and I have applied some font-weight properties. Then, I have logged the NSMutableAttributedString and get the following output.

My Sample Code:

NSString *contAtRng = @"It's blank.\u000e test \u000f";
NSMutableAttributedString *attrText = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc] initWithString:contAtRng];
NSMutableDictionary *attrs = [NSMutableDictionary new];
[attrs setObject:[UIFont fontWithName:@"HelveticaNeue-Bold" size:10] forKey:NSFontAttributeName];
[attrText setAttributes:attrs range:NSMakerange(0,contAtRng.length)];
NSLog(@"String : %@",attrText);

Output:

It's blank. test {
NSFont = "<UICTFont: 0x16d22250> font-family: \"Helvetica Neue\"; font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; font-size: 10.00pt";}

The NSMutableAttributedString length is 17, now.

In the result, Unicode characters are missing. I don't know what I did wrong with my code.

share|improve this question
1  
Do the characters 0x000e and 0x000f have glyphs? They appear to be control characters. – trojanfoe Sep 30 '13 at 7:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you are trying to create NSMutableAttributedString with some specific font family (Ex: HelveticaNeue-Bold) which contains some unicode characters, It will replace the unicode character with empty string and provide the remaining string.

So, We'll miss the unicode characters.

To avoid this problem, Skip the unicode characters while setting font family for the NSMutableAttributedString

Here is my code:

NSString *contAtRng = @"It's blank.\u000e test \u000f";
NSMutableAttributedString *attrText = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc] initWithString:contAtRng];
NSMutableDictionary *attrs = [NSMutableDictionary new];  
[attrs setObject:[UIFont fontWithName:@"HelveticaNeue-Bold" size:10] forKey:NSFontAttributeName];
[attrText setAttributes:attrs range:NSMakerange(0,11)];
[attrText setAttributes:attrs range:NSMakerange(12,6)];
NSLog(@"String : %@",attrText);
share|improve this answer

Try upper-case U: \U000e as per Apple's documentation

Also refer to this question.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.