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I've taken 2 OOP C# classes, but now our professor is switching over to c++. So, to get used to c++, I wrote this very simple program, but I keep getting this error:

error C2533: 'Counter::{ctor}' : constructors not allowed a return type

I'm confused, because I believe I have coded my default constructor right.

Here's my code for the simple counter class:

class Counter
{
private:
int count;
bool isCounted;

public:
Counter();
bool IsCountable();
void IncrementCount();
void DecrementCount();
int GetCount();
}

Counter::Counter()
{
count = 0;
isCounted = false;
}

bool Counter::IsCountable()
{
if (count == 0)
	return false;
else
	return true;
}

void Counter::IncrementCount()
{
count++;
isCounted = true;
}

void Counter::DecrementCount()
{
count--;
isCounted = true;
}

int Counter::GetCount()
{
return count;
}

What am I doing wrong? I'm not specifying a return type. Or am I somehow?

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1  
Please read up on initialization lists: informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=cplusplus&seqNum=172 –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 15 '09 at 17:49
    
Alright, I will. –  Alex Dec 15 '09 at 17:51
    
IsCountable can be simplified to return count == 0. BTW, why do you have a member isCounter if it is never read (used)? –  Thomas Matthews Dec 15 '09 at 19:14
    
Correction, that should be why do you have isCounted... –  Thomas Matthews Dec 15 '09 at 19:15
    
@Georg: Member initialization lists. Important distinction, and a common error. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 16 '11 at 13:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You forgot the semi-colon at the end of your class definition. Without the semi-colon, the compiler thinks the class you just defined is the return type for the constructor following it in the source file. This is a common C++ error to make, memorize the solution, you'll need it again.

class Counter
{
private:
int count;
bool isCounted;

public:
Counter();
bool IsCountable();
void IncrementCount();
void DecrementCount();
int GetCount();
};
share|improve this answer
    
wow. That was it. In c++ you need semicolons after your class definitions? –  Alex Dec 15 '09 at 17:48
    
This is where GCC shines a bit - you get the diagnostic "note: (perhaps a semicolon is missing after the definition of 'Counter')" –  anon Dec 15 '09 at 17:51
    
@Alex Yes - just like you need them after struct definitions in C. –  anon Dec 15 '09 at 17:52
    
Ok, thanks. :) I'll remember that. –  Alex Dec 15 '09 at 17:57
    
Between the missing semicolon end the missing namespace end... sometimes you really are in for a world of pain... and the fact that it crosses files (with the include mechanism) isn't really charming either :/ –  Matthieu M. Dec 15 '09 at 19:07

You need to end your class declaration with a semicolon.

class Counter
{
private:
int count;
bool isCounted;

public:
Counter();
bool IsCountable();
void IncrementCount();
void DecrementCount();
int GetCount();
} ;
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