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The documentation for cvPtr?D is confusing:

The functions return a pointer to a specific array element. Number of array dimension should match to the number of indices passed to the function except for cvPtr1D function that can be used for sequential access to 1D, 2D or nD dense arrays.

Did they miss a comma or something after "except for cvPtr1D function" because, as it is, it doesnt make any sense.

Should it be like the below, so that it makes sense?

The functions return a pointer to a specific array element. Number of array dimension should match to the number of indices passed to the function except for cvPtr1D function , <--- comma inserted that can be used for sequential access to 1D, 2D or nD dense arrays.

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please move over to the c++ api, support for c will get dropped soon –  berak Sep 30 '13 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

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Even with comma it doesn't make much sense. Shouldn't it be:

The functions return a pointer to a specific array element. With the exception of cvPtr1D, the number of array dimensions should match the number of indices passed to the function. In the case of `cvPtr1D, the index can be used for sequential access to 1D, 2D or nD dense arrays

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@berak is there online documentation to support what you just said about c being removed and if it is removed, if I kept my my 2.4.6.1 build would i always be able to use it...I ask because i'm writing a lisp wrapper for opencv's c interface and lisp, a major a.i. language really has no CV library, so could I even keep the opencv library 2.4.6.1 build and redistribute it with my lisp package so Common Lisp would always have at least some sort of computer vision...I aim to keep it updated even if I have to go through the c++ source code and rewrite the functions myself in Lisp –  user2735131 Sep 30 '13 at 12:18
    
@user2735131 according to opencv.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/icvs/… OpenCV3.0 will mark the C API as deprecated. Of course you can keep 2.4.6,but eventually your lisp binding will become unattractive when it won't work with the later versions of OpenCV. –  B... Sep 30 '13 at 12:45

The sentence is a bit confusing. IIRC the cvPtrxD (x > 1) can be used only on arrays with matching dimensions. It will return value at corresponding address.

The cvPtr1D is exception. Because it acts as ordinary pointer, it can be used for any array. The catch is, you have to calculate the address of element yourself.

For example cvPtr2D(10,10) is equivalent to cvPtr1D(210), if the 2D array has size 20x20 and is stored linearly.

The usual formula for storing 2D arrays in 1D fashion is: index = yPos * width + xPos where xPos and yPos are location along respective axis and width is size along Y axis.

This idea can be generalized for higher dimension.

PS: Don't use C API, if don't have to. The C++ is much easier to understand and use.

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