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I am using this command to copy certain line from one file to another.Its working fine.No issue with it.

sed -f <(sed -e '1,10d; 12,$d; x; s/.*/10a\\/;p; x' ../log/file2.txt ) ../log/file4.txt > ../log/file5.txt

The problem is instead of 10, I want to use variable VAR1 (where var1=10). The $VAR1 is not working.

I tried this command.

sed -f <(sed -e '1,$VAR1d; 12,$d; x; s/.*/10a\\/;p; x' ../log/file2.txt ) ../log/file4.txt > ../log/file5.txt

Please help me.

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after replacing with double quote, its showing this error –  Mayur Sawant Sep 30 '13 at 10:35
1  
see my answer: escape backslashes and dollars –  Antigluk Sep 30 '13 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

At first, use double quotes. It will enable BASH to process string.

Next, escape backslashes (even those that supposed to be escape symbols for sed) - because bash will escape them too.

I suppose it should be

sed -f <(sed -e "1,${VAR1}d; 12,\$d; x; s/.*/10a\\\\/;p; x" ../log/file2.txt ) ../log/file4.txt > ../log/file5.txt
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thats d correct ans bro. :) –  Mayur Sawant Sep 30 '13 at 10:59

Try double qoutes and curly braces:

 sed -f <(sed -e "1,${VAR1}d; 12,\$d; x; s/.*/10a\\\\/;p; x" ../log/file2.txt ) ../log/file4.txt > ../log/file5.txt
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Curly braces is a good idea, although the problem were the single quotes. Double quotes do expand variables. –  fedorqui Sep 30 '13 at 10:35
    
this is not working.stackoverflow.com/users/1213227/matthias –  Mayur Sawant Sep 30 '13 at 10:53
    
@fedorqui he curly braces are needed to separate var name and command. –  Matthias Sep 30 '13 at 10:57
    
Antigluk is right - I forgot the additional double escape for double backslash (now corrected) –  Matthias Sep 30 '13 at 10:59
    
@Matthias oh, you're right, otherwise it would like for the VAR1d variable –  fedorqui Sep 30 '13 at 11:37

I prefer mix of single & double quotes:

  1. Single quotes around the text that must not be expanded. (Removes need to escape special characters.)
  2. Double quotes around the text that needs to be expanded.

e.g. Your case would look like:

sed -f <(sed -e '1,'"$VAR1"'d; 12,$d; x; s/.*/10a\\/;p; x' ../log/file2.txt ) ../log/file4.txt > ../log/file5.txt
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