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In regards to the following code:

using (SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
  code...
}

Is the SqlConnection initialized with "using" so it is dereferenced/destructed after the brackets?

Please correct my questioning where necessary.

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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

using is a syntactical shortcut for correctly calling Dispose() on the object.

After the code in the braces is finished executing, Dipose() is automatically called on the object(s) wrapped in the using statement.

At compile time, your code above will actually be expanded to

{
  SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
  try
  {
    // .. code
  }
  finally
  {
    if (sqlConnection!= null)
      ((IDisposable)sqlConnection).Dispose();
  }
}

You can see how it's a handy shortcut.

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So if I wanted to add a catch clause to this, would you recommend transforming the "using" shortcut to a try-catch-finally or wrapping the using in a try catch? I believe there to be issues with the latter, but am not sure as to exactly what they are. –  Nick Vaccaro Dec 15 '09 at 19:04
1  
Just wrap your try..catch around the using block: try { using(var db = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) { code ... } catch { panic... } or inside it: using(var db = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) { try { code... } catch { panic...} } - depending on if you want to catch exceptions thrown by "new SqlConnection(connectionString)" or not. –  Michael Stum Dec 15 '09 at 19:15
3  
I would put the using inside the try-catch. –  TheSean Dec 15 '09 at 19:17
    
Thank you guys. I did just that. –  Nick Vaccaro Dec 15 '09 at 23:04
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Yes. The using statement is just syntactic sugar, and is translated by the compiler into something like

SqlConnection sqlConnection;
try
{
  sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
  // code...
}
finally
{
  if (sqlConnection != null)
     sqlConnection.Dispose();
}
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6  
It also scopes the name "sqlConnection" to that block, so you get a compiler error if you try and use it after it's been disposed. –  ctford Dec 15 '09 at 18:06
    
Good to know. Thank you. –  Dathan Dec 15 '09 at 18:09
    
If that is how it is compiled, can you catch exceptions with the 'Using' block? –  contactmatt Dec 15 '09 at 18:13
    
Yup - just wrap your code in a try/catch/finally block. –  Dathan Dec 15 '09 at 18:27
1  
Note that sqlConnection hasn't been definitely assigned in the finally here... –  Marc Gravell Dec 15 '09 at 18:52
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using is a language construct that takes an IDisposable and calls Dispose() on it.

So

using (SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
  code...
}

is roughly equivalent to

SqlConnection sqlConnection = null;
try {
    sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString));
    code ...
} finally {
    if(sqlConnection != null) sqlConnection.Dispose();
}
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2  
+1 for not using the words 'syntactic sugar'. Can we pick a new phrase already!? –  Dan Dec 15 '09 at 18:06
    
@Dan: agreed! +1 –  µBio Dec 15 '09 at 18:13
3  
'syntactic sugar' is the term of art for new syntax that's merely a terse expression of a concept already expressible in the language. It's not going away. –  Dan Davies Brackett Dec 15 '09 at 18:24
1  
Syntactic Sugar is usually used in a negative way to indicate that it's "just some concept for amateurs who don't know the language" - also see Auto-Properties in C# (Question 9304). But I don't think that "using" is negative, it's a really great type of syntactic sugar, just like foreach is really great sugar around "GetEnumerator"-calls. So I prefer to use the term "language construct" as this makes it appear like a first-class citizen, which it clearly is IMHO. –  Michael Stum Dec 15 '09 at 19:13
    
Michael, this is a good argument for salvaging "syntactic sugar" to return the positive connotations. –  Steven Sudit Dec 15 '09 at 19:33
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When the sqlConnection variable goes out of scope (at the end of the bracketed block), the Dispose() method will automatically be called.

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After the using statement it will exit the scope which it is available in. The objects Dispose method will be called, but the object won't necessarily be garbage collected at that time.

So what this means is that if you have items which are cleaned up (files closed etc.) in the object's Dispose() method, they will get cleaned up immediately after the using statement ends. If you have a finalizer (~YourClassName) in addition to this which does other things, you cannot guarantee that will get called at that time.

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